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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing November - 2019
 
  Wednesday
Nov-20
Thought For The Week

'No river can return to its source' ~Native American Proverb

The story of the flooding in Venice has made headlines throughout the week. It has seen the worst flooding in 50 years which has also significantly damaged St Mark's Basilica in St Mark's square. The two words we are hearing so much about these days, 'Climate Change' have been used all week to explain the flooding.

While scientists cannot definitely blame an individual event on climate change, they are saying that extreme weather events like flooding or wildfires are happening more often because of climate change. Venice, already struggling with high tides, is particularly vulnerable to any further rise in the sea levels.

Flood waters have always had a deeper meaning. They are symbolic of those things that are outside our control. They are symbolic of those times in our lives when we are helpless and feeling lost. Even the poetic story of Noah and the flood has negative vibes. The story has often mistakenly been interpreted as God destroying and punishing. The story of Noah's ark in the flood is actually symbolic of God's care and protection in a time of crisis and uncertainty.

The rainbow that followed was symbolic of hope, new beginnings and a better future. In the world we live in today (and sadly this sometimes includes the Church too), it seems that hope filled stories and new beginnings are very scarce indeed. Negativity seems to be the dominant energy.

It is time to reclaim a sense of hope and embrace new beginnings. A stream or a river can never return to its source. It is always moving forward into new spaces and new directions. If it tries to remain still, it just pours out and floods. We pray for God's guidance and direction, as we embrace new pathways and new beginnings in our lives, both personally and spiritually.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Nov-19
Thought For The Week

'No river can return to its source' ~Native American Proverb

The story of the flooding in Venice has made headlines throughout the week. It has seen the worst flooding in 50 years which has also significantly damaged St Mark's Basilica in St Mark's square. The two words we are hearing so much about these days, 'Climate Change' have been used all week to explain the flooding.

While scientists cannot definitely blame an individual event on climate change, they are saying that extreme weather events like flooding or wildfires are happening more often because of climate change. Venice, already struggling with high tides, is particularly vulnerable to any further rise in the sea levels.

Flood waters have always had a deeper meaning. They are symbolic of those things that are outside our control. They are symbolic of those times in our lives when we are helpless and feeling lost. Even the poetic story of Noah and the flood has negative vibes. The story has often mistakenly been interpreted as God destroying and punishing. The story of Noah's ark in the flood is actually symbolic of God's care and protection in a time of crisis and uncertainty.

The rainbow that followed was symbolic of hope, new beginnings and a better future. In the world we live in today (and sadly this sometimes includes the Church too), it seems that hope filled stories and new beginnings are very scarce indeed. Negativity seems to be the dominant energy.

It is time to reclaim a sense of hope and embrace new beginnings. A stream or a river can never return to its source. It is always moving forward into new spaces and new directions. If it tries to remain still, it just pours out and floods. We pray for God's guidance and direction, as we embrace new pathways and new beginnings in our lives, both personally and spiritually.
 
 
 
  Monday
Nov-18
Thought For The Week

'No river can return to its source' ~Native American Proverb

The story of the flooding in Venice has made headlines throughout the week. It has seen the worst flooding in 50 years which has also significantly damaged St Mark's Basilica in St Mark's square. The two words we are hearing so much about these days, 'Climate Change' have been used all week to explain the flooding.

While scientists cannot definitely blame an individual event on climate change, they are saying that extreme weather events like flooding or wildfires are happening more often because of climate change. Venice, already struggling with high tides, is particularly vulnerable to any further rise in the sea levels.

Flood waters have always had a deeper meaning. They are symbolic of those things that are outside our control. They are symbolic of those times in our lives when we are helpless and feeling lost. Even the poetic story of Noah and the flood has negative vibes. The story has often mistakenly been interpreted as God destroying and punishing. The story of Noah's ark in the flood is actually symbolic of God's care and protection in a time of crisis and uncertainty.

The rainbow that followed was symbolic of hope, new beginnings and a better future. In the world we live in today (and sadly this sometimes includes the Church too), it seems that hope filled stories and new beginnings are very scarce indeed. Negativity seems to be the dominant energy.

It is time to reclaim a sense of hope and embrace new beginnings. A stream or a river can never return to its source. It is always moving forward into new spaces and new directions. If it tries to remain still, it just pours out and floods. We pray for God's guidance and direction, as we embrace new pathways and new beginnings in our lives, both personally and spiritually.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Nov-17
 
 
 
  Saturday
Nov-16
Thought For The Week

'The Lord is with me, like a mighty champion.' ~Jeremiah 20:11

Much has been written about South Africa's win in the rugby world cup. They have been described as true champions, who are an inspiration for their home country and who never seemed to give up when hit with challenges. True champions never give up easily.

Jeremiah features prominently in the Old Testament. His faith meant a lot to him and described God as a true champion in his life. His writings reflected this and Jeremiah comes across as upbeat, energised, positive and in a good place. But you will also find in his writings, darkness, fear and upset. There is even one part of his writing where he curses the day he was born and rebels against God and life in general. The book of Jeremiah is just brutally honest and always to the point.

His story can often be a reflection of ours too. When it comes to faith matters there are no easy options or hideouts to shield us from the knocks of life. Our belief in a loving God stretches us and pulls us. We have our doubts and our setbacks, our disappointments and frustrations. But no matter how bad things are, we can often say that our faith was the rock we could cling to. Somehow and sometimes our faith was the foothold that gave us grip when everything else was slipping around us.

It certainly happened for Jeremiah. Even after journeying through much upset and darkness, he was able to say that "The Lord is with me." Jeremiah's story has much to say to our modern world, but at its heart is the simple but hugely important message: "Do not give up"
 
 
 
  Thursday
Nov-14
Thought For The Week

'The Lord is with me, like a mighty champion.' ~Jeremiah 20:11

Much has been written about South Africa's win in the rugby world cup. They have been described as true champions, who are an inspiration for their home country and who never seemed to give up when hit with challenges. True champions never give up easily.

Jeremiah features prominently in the Old Testament. His faith meant a lot to him and described God as a true champion in his life. His writings reflected this and Jeremiah comes across as upbeat, energised, positive and in a good place. But you will also find in his writings, darkness, fear and upset. There is even one part of his writing where he curses the day he was born and rebels against God and life in general. The book of Jeremiah is just brutally honest and always to the point.

His story can often be a reflection of ours too. When it comes to faith matters there are no easy options or hideouts to shield us from the knocks of life. Our belief in a loving God stretches us and pulls us. We have our doubts and our setbacks, our disappointments and frustrations. But no matter how bad things are, we can often say that our faith was the rock we could cling to. Somehow and sometimes our faith was the foothold that gave us grip when everything else was slipping around us.

It certainly happened for Jeremiah. Even after journeying through much upset and darkness, he was able to say that "The Lord is with me." Jeremiah's story has much to say to our modern world, but at its heart is the simple but hugely important message: "Do not give up"
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Nov-13
Thought For The Week

'The Lord is with me, like a mighty champion.' ~Jeremiah 20:11

Much has been written about South Africa's win in the rugby world cup. They have been described as true champions, who are an inspiration for their home country and who never seemed to give up when hit with challenges. True champions never give up easily.

Jeremiah features prominently in the Old Testament. His faith meant a lot to him and described God as a true champion in his life. His writings reflected this and Jeremiah comes across as upbeat, energised, positive and in a good place. But you will also find in his writings, darkness, fear and upset. There is even one part of his writing where he curses the day he was born and rebels against God and life in general. The book of Jeremiah is just brutally honest and always to the point.

His story can often be a reflection of ours too. When it comes to faith matters there are no easy options or hideouts to shield us from the knocks of life. Our belief in a loving God stretches us and pulls us. We have our doubts and our setbacks, our disappointments and frustrations. But no matter how bad things are, we can often say that our faith was the rock we could cling to. Somehow and sometimes our faith was the foothold that gave us grip when everything else was slipping around us.

It certainly happened for Jeremiah. Even after journeying through much upset and darkness, he was able to say that "The Lord is with me." Jeremiah's story has much to say to our modern world, but at its heart is the simple but hugely important message: "Do not give up"
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Nov-12
Thought For The Week

'The Lord is with me, like a mighty champion.' ~Jeremiah 20:11

Much has been written about South Africa's win in the rugby world cup. They have been described as true champions, who are an inspiration for their home country and who never seemed to give up when hit with challenges. True champions never give up easily.

Jeremiah features prominently in the Old Testament. His faith meant a lot to him and described God as a true champion in his life. His writings reflected this and Jeremiah comes across as upbeat, energised, positive and in a good place. But you will also find in his writings, darkness, fear and upset. There is even one part of his writing where he curses the day he was born and rebels against God and life in general. The book of Jeremiah is just brutally honest and always to the point.

His story can often be a reflection of ours too. When it comes to faith matters there are no easy options or hideouts to shield us from the knocks of life. Our belief in a loving God stretches us and pulls us. We have our doubts and our setbacks, our disappointments and frustrations. But no matter how bad things are, we can often say that our faith was the rock we could cling to. Somehow and sometimes our faith was the foothold that gave us grip when everything else was slipping around us.

It certainly happened for Jeremiah. Even after journeying through much upset and darkness, he was able to say that "The Lord is with me." Jeremiah's story has much to say to our modern world, but at its heart is the simple but hugely important message: "Do not give up"
 
 
 
  Monday
Nov-11
Thought For The Week

'The Lord is with me, like a mighty champion.' ~Jeremiah 20:11

Much has been written about South Africa's win in the rugby world cup. They have been described as true champions, who are an inspiration for their home country and who never seemed to give up when hit with challenges. True champions never give up easily.

Jeremiah features prominently in the Old Testament. His faith meant a lot to him and described God as a true champion in his life. His writings reflected this and Jeremiah comes across as upbeat, energised, positive and in a good place. But you will also find in his writings, darkness, fear and upset. There is even one part of his writing where he curses the day he was born and rebels against God and life in general. The book of Jeremiah is just brutally honest and always to the point.

His story can often be a reflection of ours too. When it comes to faith matters there are no easy options or hideouts to shield us from the knocks of life. Our belief in a loving God stretches us and pulls us. We have our doubts and our setbacks, our disappointments and frustrations. But no matter how bad things are, we can often say that our faith was the rock we could cling to. Somehow and sometimes our faith was the foothold that gave us grip when everything else was slipping around us.

It certainly happened for Jeremiah. Even after journeying through much upset and darkness, he was able to say that "The Lord is with me." Jeremiah's story has much to say to our modern world, but at its heart is the simple but hugely important message: "Do not give up"
 
 
 
  Sunday
Nov-10
'Every day, another person dies or is seriously injured on our roads. This can't go on. We remember those who have died, we think of the never ending grief of their loved ones and then we think about how we can change our own behaviour to ensure that we and our family are safe on the road.' ~Gay Byrne

Speed causes 40% of all fatal crashes each year. At 60mph (100kmp) we travel 88 feet in just one second. The faster we go the greater the distance we will need to stop. If only we could slow down a little. If only there was no drink driving. If only everyone wore their seat belt. In Ireland at least, attitudes are changing slowly but we have a long way to go. We all have a part to play in road safety. But today we pause and pray for all those who have died from a road traffic accident. We also remember their families.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Nov-09
'Death ends a life, not a relationship.' ~Robert Benchley

It is always difficult to understand death or make sense of the loss of a loved one through death. We want our loved ones with us always and yet we know that just as we are born we must also die. The month of November is a month to pause, reflect and pray for those who have died particularly our nearest and dearest.

Many people will visit a cemetery today or at some stage during this month of November. It is not an empty or meaningless task. It's always good to remember those who have died. Our belief is that death is not an end but a beginning for the soul or spirit of the person who has died. Our belief is that our loved ones who have died are still near us but not physically with us. Trying to put this into words is never easy. They are in the place we call heaven or the place of eternal light and love.

There is a book called 'Bringing death to life' written by Patricia Scanlan. The book is a beautiful exploration of living, dying, the soul journey and the afterlife. The following lines in one part of the book stand out: "I accept death as my life companion. It exists not to frighten me but to befriend me - not to haunt me but to enlighten me. I recognise that it is not the end, but only a step on the eternal journey of light, from which I have come and to which I will return. Nothing is lost, that will not be returned."

The only words that really matter today are to our loved ones who have died. Some of these words might be: we still miss you, thank you for so many memories, you are remembered with love today, you will never be forgotten and may you rest in peace. Amen
 
 
 
  Thursday
Nov-07
'Death ends a life, not a relationship.' ~Robert Benchley

It is always difficult to understand death or make sense of the loss of a loved one through death. We want our loved ones with us always and yet we know that just as we are born we must also die. The month of November is a month to pause, reflect and pray for those who have died particularly our nearest and dearest.

Many people will visit a cemetery today or at some stage during this month of November. It is not an empty or meaningless task. It's always good to remember those who have died. Our belief is that death is not an end but a beginning for the soul or spirit of the person who has died. Our belief is that our loved ones who have died are still near us but not physically with us. Trying to put this into words is never easy. They are in the place we call heaven or the place of eternal light and love.

There is a book called 'Bringing death to life' written by Patricia Scanlan. The book is a beautiful exploration of living, dying, the soul journey and the afterlife. The following lines in one part of the book stand out: "I accept death as my life companion. It exists not to frighten me but to befriend me - not to haunt me but to enlighten me. I recognise that it is not the end, but only a step on the eternal journey of light, from which I have come and to which I will return. Nothing is lost, that will not be returned."

The only words that really matter today are to our loved ones who have died. Some of these words might be: we still miss you, thank you for so many memories, you are remembered with love today, you will never be forgotten and may you rest in peace. Amen
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Nov-06
'Death ends a life, not a relationship.' ~Robert Benchley

It is always difficult to understand death or make sense of the loss of a loved one through death. We want our loved ones with us always and yet we know that just as we are born we must also die. The month of November is a month to pause, reflect and pray for those who have died particularly our nearest and dearest.

Many people will visit a cemetery today or at some stage during this month of November. It is not an empty or meaningless task. It's always good to remember those who have died. Our belief is that death is not an end but a beginning for the soul or spirit of the person who has died. Our belief is that our loved ones who have died are still near us but not physically with us. Trying to put this into words is never easy. They are in the place we call heaven or the place of eternal light and love.

There is a book called 'Bringing death to life' written by Patricia Scanlan. The book is a beautiful exploration of living, dying, the soul journey and the afterlife. The following lines in one part of the book stand out: "I accept death as my life companion. It exists not to frighten me but to befriend me - not to haunt me but to enlighten me. I recognise that it is not the end, but only a step on the eternal journey of light, from which I have come and to which I will return. Nothing is lost, that will not be returned."

The only words that really matter today are to our loved ones who have died. Some of these words might be: we still miss you, thank you for so many memories, you are remembered with love today, you will never be forgotten and may you rest in peace. Amen
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Nov-05
'Death ends a life, not a relationship.' ~Robert Benchley

It is always difficult to understand death or make sense of the loss of a loved one through death. We want our loved ones with us always and yet we know that just as we are born we must also die. The month of November is a month to pause, reflect and pray for those who have died particularly our nearest and dearest.

Many people will visit a cemetery today or at some stage during this month of November. It is not an empty or meaningless task. It's always good to remember those who have died. Our belief is that death is not an end but a beginning for the soul or spirit of the person who has died. Our belief is that our loved ones who have died are still near us but not physically with us. Trying to put this into words is never easy. They are in the place we call heaven or the place of eternal light and love.

There is a book called 'Bringing death to life' written by Patricia Scanlan. The book is a beautiful exploration of living, dying, the soul journey and the afterlife. The following lines in one part of the book stand out: "I accept death as my life companion. It exists not to frighten me but to befriend me - not to haunt me but to enlighten me. I recognise that it is not the end, but only a step on the eternal journey of light, from which I have come and to which I will return. Nothing is lost, that will not be returned."

The only words that really matter today are to our loved ones who have died. Some of these words might be: we still miss you, thank you for so many memories, you are remembered with love today, you will never be forgotten and may you rest in peace. Amen
 
 
 
  Monday
Nov-04
'Death ends a life, not a relationship.' ~Robert Benchley

It is always difficult to understand death or make sense of the loss of a loved one through death. We want our loved ones with us always and yet we know that just as we are born we must also die. The month of November is a month to pause, reflect and pray for those who have died particularly our nearest and dearest.

Many people will visit a cemetery today or at some stage during this month of November. It is not an empty or meaningless task. It's always good to remember those who have died. Our belief is that death is not an end but a beginning for the soul or spirit of the person who has died. Our belief is that our loved ones who have died are still near us but not physically with us. Trying to put this into words is never easy. They are in the place we call heaven or the place of eternal light and love.

There is a book called 'Bringing death to life' written by Patricia Scanlan. The book is a beautiful exploration of living, dying, the soul journey and the afterlife. The following lines in one part of the book stand out: "I accept death as my life companion. It exists not to frighten me but to befriend me - not to haunt me but to enlighten me. I recognise that it is not the end, but only a step on the eternal journey of light, from which I have come and to which I will return. Nothing is lost, that will not be returned."

The only words that really matter today are to our loved ones who have died. Some of these words might be: we still miss you, thank you for so many memories, you are remembered with love today, you will never be forgotten and may you rest in peace. Amen
 
 
 
  Sunday
Nov-03
Thought For Today is by Jane Mellett called 'Zacchaeus'

In today's Gospel we hear the familiar story of Zacchaeus. It is a story that may remind us of our childhood, our first confession, or, as in my case, it might bring a school song to mind that you can't get out of your head! As with all familiar Gospel stories, we are invited to read again with fresh eyes and hear again as if for the first time. For this story is very rich and we risk losing the meaning due to our familiarity with it.

Like many people today, Zacchaeus was a 'seeker.' We read that he was anxious to see what Jesus was like. Clearly, he was drawn to Jesus in some way, was searching for something or someone. Zacchaeus was an outcast, a tax collector, considered a sinner by the community. Yet Jesus reaches out to him in a gesture of hospitality and friendship. In return, Zacchaeus offers the strictest requirement, as noted in the Jewish scriptures, for restitution: 'four times the amount' of money he had taken from people. But notice that Jesus reaches out in love before Zacchaeus offers compensation for his crimes.

The encounter with Jesus has led Zacchaeus to be a witness to restoration and solidarity. He wants to restore justice where he has acted unjustly. Whether it was the crowd, greed, politics or corruption that was preventing Zacchaeus from seeing Jesus, he has been welcomed back to the table. Jesus is waiting to be invited to his home today. Complaints and negativity continue in the background, but none of that matters. This man is a 'son of Abraham'. It was the affection of Christ, not the condemnation of the town, that reversed the situation.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Nov-02
'We believe that all the ties of friendship and affection which knit us as one throughout our lives do not end with death. Confident that God always remembers the good we have done and forgives our sins, let us pray, asking God to gather our loved ones to eternal life.' ~Prayer of the Church for those who have died

We have just begun our journey through November. Traditionally it is a month when we remember and pray for those who have died. Some might say that such a tradition is morbid and outdated. But evidence at ground level would say that for many people it is a hugely important tradition. Many find it comforting and consoling to have prayers for their loved ones said. Many more find it comforting to visit the grave of a loved one, light a candle, bring some flowers, say a quiet prayer or flick through a photo album to touch in on memories. How we mark this month of November in remembering those who have died is always going to be personal. Whatever works for us is good.

The one common link we all have is the loss and how we miss our nearest and dearest. The loss often goes beyond words and November is a month when we can find meaningful ways of expressing this loss. Our prayers for those who have died is also a good thing. In prayer we stand in God's presence and in praying for those who have died we are in some way connected with them. Our nearest and dearest who have gone on before us, will always have a special place in our hearts. They will never be forgotten. May they rest in peace.
 
 
 
  Friday
Nov-01
`I was in love with loving.'~St.Augustine

The following has been written about love. They say it is patient and kind. It sees beyond another's faults for love they say is blind. Love will not diminish or rust or fade with years. But it will gain its strength from time, from laughter, joy and tears. Love is God's own gift to us and a present from above. God gives us peace and God gives us joy. But first of all God gives us love. Today is the feast of All Saints. At its heart is love. It is a feast day that's all about the love of all our loved ones who have died. These people lived good, decent and down to earth lives. They may not have been famous, they may not have made headlines but in God's eyes they are now celebrities. Today we call them saints and we thank them for all the love they have shown us down through the years.
 
 

 

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