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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing March - 2017
 
  Friday
Mar-31
'Regardless of what you believe in churches are extraordinary places of peace. Take a pew and absorb the atmosphere of absolute peace and calm that permeates them.' ~Paul Wison

Last Thursday St. Columba's church in Derry had two funeral Masses, that of Martin McGuinness and Ryan McBride. A week earlier in St Patrick's church, Glencullen, Co.Dublin we had the funeral Mass of Capt Dara Fitzpatrick. This week all over the world, churches will be used for funerals, weddings, christenings and for Sunday Mass. We often take these places of worship for granted and yet we know that for many people these churches are great anchors. They help us during good days but particularly during difficult and challenging days too.

Everyone has their own favourite church. It might be your own local one, the one you got married in or the one you were baptised. It might be a big huge cathedral or a small country chapel in the heart of the country. The sites of these churches, particularly the older ones, were picked because they were known locally as being 'special' or the energy and feel was sacred. It was known locally as a 'sacred site'.

Every church has its own character, its own feel and energy and is always a place of peace. It is little wonder that you find people drawn to churches each day. It is not always to a formal liturgy that is the priority. Sometimes people are happy just to walk in and sit in silence. Some light a candle but for nearly everyone it is to absorb the peace and calm that one so often finds in a church. It is the best prayer of them all and it doesn't always have to be about words. It is good too to appreciate your local church and to know that it is a vital anchor in our local community.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Mar-30
'Regardless of what you believe in churches are extraordinary places of peace. Take a pew and absorb the atmosphere of absolute peace and calm that permeates them.' ~Paul Wison

Last Thursday St. Columba's church in Derry had two funeral Masses, that of Martin McGuinness and Ryan McBride. A week earlier in St Patrick's church, Glencullen, Co.Dublin we had the funeral Mass of Capt Dara Fitzpatrick. This week all over the world, churches will be used for funerals, weddings, christenings and for Sunday Mass. We often take these places of worship for granted and yet we know that for many people these churches are great anchors. They help us during good days but particularly during difficult and challenging days too.

Everyone has their own favourite church. It might be your own local one, the one you got married in or the one you were baptised. It might be a big huge cathedral or a small country chapel in the heart of the country. The sites of these churches, particularly the older ones, were picked because they were known locally as being 'special' or the energy and feel was sacred. It was known locally as a 'sacred site'.

Every church has its own character, its own feel and energy and is always a place of peace. It is little wonder that you find people drawn to churches each day. It is not always to a formal liturgy that is the priority. Sometimes people are happy just to walk in and sit in silence. Some light a candle but for nearly everyone it is to absorb the peace and calm that one so often finds in a church. It is the best prayer of them all and it doesn't always have to be about words. It is good too to appreciate your local church and to know that it is a vital anchor in our local community.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Mar-29
'Regardless of what you believe in churches are extraordinary places of peace. Take a pew and absorb the atmosphere of absolute peace and calm that permeates them.' ~Paul Wison

Last Thursday St. Columba's church in Derry had two funeral Masses, that of Martin McGuinness and Ryan McBride. A week earlier in St Patrick's church, Glencullen, Co.Dublin we had the funeral Mass of Capt Dara Fitzpatrick. This week all over the world, churches will be used for funerals, weddings, christenings and for Sunday Mass. We often take these places of worship for granted and yet we know that for many people these churches are great anchors. They help us during good days but particularly during difficult and challenging days too.

Everyone has their own favourite church. It might be your own local one, the one you got married in or the one you were baptised. It might be a big huge cathedral or a small country chapel in the heart of the country. The sites of these churches, particularly the older ones, were picked because they were known locally as being 'special' or the energy and feel was sacred. It was known locally as a 'sacred site'.

Every church has its own character, its own feel and energy and is always a place of peace. It is little wonder that you find people drawn to churches each day. It is not always to a formal liturgy that is the priority. Sometimes people are happy just to walk in and sit in silence. Some light a candle but for nearly everyone it is to absorb the peace and calm that one so often finds in a church. It is the best prayer of them all and it doesn't always have to be about words. It is good too to appreciate your local church and to know that it is a vital anchor in our local community.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Mar-28
'Regardless of what you believe in churches are extraordinary places of peace. Take a pew and absorb the atmosphere of absolute peace and calm that permeates them.' ~Paul Wison

Last Thursday St. Columba's church in Derry had two funeral Masses, that of Martin McGuinness and Ryan McBride. A week earlier in St Patrick's church, Glencullen, Co.Dublin we had the funeral Mass of Capt Dara Fitzpatrick. This weekend all over the world, churches were used for funerals, weddings, christenings and for Sunday Mass. We often take these places of worship for granted and yet we know that for many people these churches are great anchors. They help us during good days but particularly during difficult and challenging days too.

Everyone has their own favourite church. It might be your own local one, the one you got married in or the one you were baptised. It might be a big huge cathedral or a small country chapel in the heart of the country. The sites of these churches, particularly the older ones, were picked because they were known locally as being 'special' or the energy and feel was sacred. It was known locally as a 'sacred site'.

Every church has its own character, its own feel and energy and is always a place of peace. It is little wonder that you find people drawn to churches each day. It is not always to a formal liturgy that is the priority. Sometimes people are happy just to walk in and sit in silence. Some light a candle but for nearly everyone it is to absorb the peace and calm that one so often finds in a church. It is the best prayer of them all and it doesn't always have to be about words. It is good too to appreciate your local church and to know that it is a vital anchor in our local community.
 
 
 
  Monday
Mar-27
'Regardless of what you believe in churches are extraordinary places of peace. Take a pew and absorb the atmosphere of absolute peace and calm that permeates them.' ~Paul Wison

Last Thursday St. Columba's church in Derry had two funeral Masses, that of Martin McGuinness and Ryan McBride. A week earlier in St Patrick's church, Glencullen, Co.Dublin we had the funeral Mass of Capt Dara Fitzpatrick. This weekend all over the world, churches were used for funerals, weddings, christenings and for Sunday Mass. We often take these places of worship for granted and yet we know that for many people these churches are great anchors. They help us during good days but particularly during difficult and challenging days too.

Everyone has their own favourite church. It might be your own local one, the one you got married in or the one you were baptised. It might be a big huge cathedral or a small country chapel in the heart of the country. The sites of these churches, particularly the older ones, were picked because they were known locally as being 'special' or the energy and feel was sacred. It was known locally as a 'sacred site'.

Every church has its own character, its own feel and energy and is always a place of peace. It is little wonder that you find people drawn to churches each day. It is not always to a formal liturgy that is the priority. Sometimes people are happy just to walk in and sit in silence. Some light a candle but for nearly everyone it is to absorb the peace and calm that one so often finds in a church. It is the best prayer of them all and it doesn't always have to be about words. It is good too to appreciate your local church and to know that it is a vital anchor in our local community.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Mar-26
Thought For Today by Triona Doherty

What a convoluted Gospel we have today. The healing of the blind man unleashes a chain of chaos and confusion. His neighbours are dumbfounded, the Pharisees are suspicious and at war with one another, and the Jews are cynical, even calling in the man's parents as witnesses.

The character of Jesus, and of the blind man, are called into question as everyone tries to figure out what has happened. Jesus and the man who has been healed are both accused of being sinners. The interrogators even ridicule the man, asking, 'Are you trying to teach us, and you a sinner through and through?'

But things are simple for the man who has experienced Jesus' healing. He knows what he has witnessed, and is ready and willing to attest to it. 'If this man were not from God,' he says, 'he couldn't do a thing.' He understands that his encounter with Jesus was extraordinary. Jesus finally clears up the confusion, turning everything on its head, as is often his way. It is the man who had been blind who sees who Jesus is: 'Lord, I believe.' The Pharisees who think they see things clearly are the ones who are really blind to the truth. 'We are not blind, surely?' is the question facing all of us as we advance through Lent. Are we open to the Good News and the healing power of Jesus?
 
 
 
  Saturday
Mar-25
Due to the St Patrick's weekend celebrations I did not get down to write a Thought For The Week so I am including this one written by Triona Doherty


'There is a crack in everything - that's how the light get in.' ~ Leonard Cohen


No one is perfect. This might seem like the most obvious statement in the world, but it's important to remember. We live in a time when people's thoughts and actions are more widely recorded and open to scrutiny than ever before. A small mistake can cost someone their reputation or livelihood. An opinion expressed, particularly online, can invite a world of insults. It appears to be easier than ever to take the moral high ground, and to dismiss a person entirely based on one thing we know about them.

This is not the way Jesus treated people, and it is not how he sees us. The Samaritan woman Jesus meets is all too aware of what the Jews think of her. She is nervous when approached by Jesus at the well. But he sees beyond the label to the person, the woman with a life story and a context of her own. He engages her in intellectual conversation, listens to her, and wins her over.

Jesus could tell the woman everything about her life, and he knows each one of us just as intimately. He knows our past and our faults, our 'cracks'. That is why he is able to speak to us, if we resolve to try and listen. It is also an important lesson in how we should treat others.
 
 
 
  Friday
Mar-24
Due to the St Patrick's weekend celebrations I did not get down to write a Thought For The Week so I am including this one written by Triona Doherty


'There is a crack in everything - that's how the light get in.' ~ Leonard Cohen


No one is perfect. This might seem like the most obvious statement in the world, but it's important to remember. We live in a time when people's thoughts and actions are more widely recorded and open to scrutiny than ever before. A small mistake can cost someone their reputation or livelihood. An opinion expressed, particularly online, can invite a world of insults. It appears to be easier than ever to take the moral high ground, and to dismiss a person entirely based on one thing we know about them.

This is not the way Jesus treated people, and it is not how he sees us. The Samaritan woman Jesus meets is all too aware of what the Jews think of her. She is nervous when approached by Jesus at the well. But he sees beyond the label to the person, the woman with a life story and a context of her own. He engages her in intellectual conversation, listens to her, and wins her over.

Jesus could tell the woman everything about her life, and he knows each one of us just as intimately. He knows our past and our faults, our 'cracks'. That is why he is able to speak to us, if we resolve to try and listen. It is also an important lesson in how we should treat others.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Mar-23
Due to the St Patrick's weekend celebrations I did not get down to write a Thought For The Week so I am including this one written by Triona Doherty


'There is a crack in everything - that's how the light get in.' ~ Leonard Cohen


No one is perfect. This might seem like the most obvious statement in the world, but it's important to remember. We live in a time when people's thoughts and actions are more widely recorded and open to scrutiny than ever before. A small mistake can cost someone their reputation or livelihood. An opinion expressed, particularly online, can invite a world of insults. It appears to be easier than ever to take the moral high ground, and to dismiss a person entirely based on one thing we know about them.

This is not the way Jesus treated people, and it is not how he sees us. The Samaritan woman Jesus meets is all too aware of what the Jews think of her. She is nervous when approached by Jesus at the well. But he sees beyond the label to the person, the woman with a life story and a context of her own. He engages her in intellectual conversation, listens to her, and wins her over.

Jesus could tell the woman everything about her life, and he knows each one of us just as intimately. He knows our past and our faults, our 'cracks'. That is why he is able to speak to us, if we resolve to try and listen. It is also an important lesson in how we should treat others.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Mar-22
Due to the St Patrick's weekend celebrations I did not get down to write a Thought For The Week so I am including this one written by Triona Doherty


'There is a crack in everything - that's how the light get in.' ~ Leonard Cohen


No one is perfect. This might seem like the most obvious statement in the world, but it's important to remember. We live in a time when people's thoughts and actions are more widely recorded and open to scrutiny than ever before. A small mistake can cost someone their reputation or livelihood. An opinion expressed, particularly online, can invite a world of insults. It appears to be easier than ever to take the moral high ground, and to dismiss a person entirely based on one thing we know about them.

This is not the way Jesus treated people, and it is not how he sees us. The Samaritan woman Jesus meets is all too aware of what the Jews think of her. She is nervous when approached by Jesus at the well. But he sees beyond the label to the person, the woman with a life story and a context of her own. He engages her in intellectual conversation, listens to her, and wins her over.

Jesus could tell the woman everything about her life, and he knows each one of us just as intimately. He knows our past and our faults, our 'cracks'. That is why he is able to speak to us, if we resolve to try and listen. It is also an important lesson in how we should treat others.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Mar-21
Due to the St Patrick's weekend celebrations I did not get down to write a Thought For The Week so I am including this one written by Triona Doherty


'There is a crack in everything - that's how the light get in.' ~ Leonard Cohen


No one is perfect. This might seem like the most obvious statement in the world, but it's important to remember. We live in a time when people's thoughts and actions are more widely recorded and open to scrutiny than ever before. A small mistake can cost someone their reputation or livelihood. An opinion expressed, particularly online, can invite a world of insults. It appears to be easier than ever to take the moral high ground, and to dismiss a person entirely based on one thing we know about them.

This is not the way Jesus treated people, and it is not how he sees us. The Samaritan woman Jesus meets is all too aware of what the Jews think of her. She is nervous when approached by Jesus at the well. But he sees beyond the label to the person, the woman with a life story and a context of her own. He engages her in intellectual conversation, listens to her, and wins her over.

Jesus could tell the woman everything about her life, and he knows each one of us just as intimately. He knows our past and our faults, our 'cracks'. That is why he is able to speak to us, if we resolve to try and listen. It is also an important lesson in how we should treat others.
 
 
 
  Monday
Mar-20
Due to the St Patrick's weekend celebrations I did not get down to write a Thought For The Week so I am including this one written by Triona Doherty


'There is a crack in everything - that's how the light get in.' ~ Leonard Cohen


No one is perfect. This might seem like the most obvious statement in the world, but it's important to remember. We live in a time when people's thoughts and actions are more widely recorded and open to scrutiny than ever before. A small mistake can cost someone their reputation or livelihood. An opinion expressed, particularly online, can invite a world of insults. It appears to be easier than ever to take the moral high ground, and to dismiss a person entirely based on one thing we know about them.

This is not the way Jesus treated people, and it is not how he sees us. The Samaritan woman Jesus meets is all too aware of what the Jews think of her. She is nervous when approached by Jesus at the well. But he sees beyond the label to the person, the woman with a life story and a context of her own. He engages her in intellectual conversation, listens to her, and wins her over.

Jesus could tell the woman everything about her life, and he knows each one of us just as intimately. He knows our past and our faults, our 'cracks'. That is why he is able to speak to us, if we resolve to try and listen. It is also an important lesson in how we should treat others.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Mar-19
Our Thought For Today is by Triona Doherty from Intercom Magazine

'There is a crack in everything - that's how the light gets in.' ~ Leonard Cohen

No one is perfect. This might seem like the most obvious statement in the world, but it's important to remember. We live in a time when people's thoughts and actions are more widely recorded and open to scrutiny than ever before. A small mistake can cost someone their reputation or livelihood. An opinion expressed, particularly online, can invite a world of insults. It appears to be easier than ever to take the moral high ground, and to dismiss a person entirely based on one thing we know about them.

This is not the way Jesus treated people, and it is not how he sees us. The Samaritan woman Jesus meets is all too aware of what the Jews think of her. She is nervous when approached by Jesus at the well. But he sees beyond the label to the person, the woman with a life story and a context of her own. He engages her in intellectual conversation, listens to her, and wins her over.

Jesus could tell the woman everything about her life, and he knows each one of us just as intimately. He knows our past and our faults, our 'cracks'. That is why he is able to speak to us, if we resolve to try and listen. It is also an important lesson in how we should treat others.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Mar-18
Thought For The Week

'Every Christian is called to experience God's unconditional love working itself out in everyday events. For the young mother, for the fellow afraid of changing careers, for all of us, it's never a question of "prayer life" versus "real life". Saints don't lead two lives but one.' ~Albert Holtz

The biggest mistake we can make when it comes to spiritual matters is to separate our spirituality from our everyday lives. Such a split can never work because both are connected so closely. They are so close that they are actually one. If we go back hundreds of years to our Celtic ancestors, they had that balance just right. For them God is to be found in our everyday lives. Everything we do is like a breath of God. From the smallest job to the least important task, God is to be found. With St Patrick we know that his life is probably the best example of someone who never separated his spirituality from everyday life. For him both were completely connected almost effortlessly. He reminds us beautifully, that the most important event right down to the one that seems almost trivial, we will find God in there too.

It was many years after St. Patrick that we slowly lost this connection. There was an ongoing effort to confine God to a particular place and time. God for example could only be found in huge cathedrals and big churches. It seemed that bigger was better. We began to separate spirituality and our everyday lives. The connection was lost and this has been a huge loss. It was something St Patrick would not have wanted. But if we look at his life, we can see that he never led two separate lives but always one. As we journey through these weeks of Lent, the invitation is to know that God's unique love for us, will be found very much in our everyday lives.
 
 
 
  Friday
Mar-17
Thought For The Week

'Every Christian is called to experience God's unconditional love working itself out in everyday events. For the young mother, for the fellow afraid of changing careers, for all of us, it's never a question of "prayer life" versus "real life". Saints don't lead two lives but one.' ~Albert Holtz

The biggest mistake we can make when it comes to spiritual matters is to separate our spirituality from our everyday lives. Such a split can never work because both are connected so closely. They are so close that they are actually one. If we go back hundreds of years to our Celtic ancestors, they had that balance just right. For them God is to be found in our everyday lives. Everything we do is like a breath of God. From the smallest job to the least important task, God is to be found. As we look forward to St Patrick's Day today, we know that his life is probably the best example of someone who never separated his spirituality from everyday life. For him both were completely connected almost effortlessly. He reminds us beautifully, that the most important event right down to the one that seems almost trivial, we will find God in there too.

It was many years after St. Patrick that we slowly lost this connection. There was an ongoing effort to confine God to a particular place and time. God for example could only be found in huge cathedrals and big churches. It seemed that bigger was better. We began to separate spirituality and our everyday lives. The connection was lost and this has been a huge loss. It was something St Patrick would not have wanted. But if we look at his life, we can see that he never led two separate lives but always one. As we journey through these weeks of Lent and as we look forward to St Patrick's Day, the invitation is to know that God's unique love for us, will be found very much in our everyday lives.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Mar-16
Thought For The Week

'Every Christian is called to experience God's unconditional love working itself out in everyday events. For the young mother, for the fellow afraid of changing careers, for all of us, it's never a question of "prayer life" versus "real life". Saints don't lead two lives but one.' ~Albert Holtz

The biggest mistake we can make when it comes to spiritual matters is to separate our spirituality from our everyday lives. Such a split can never work because both are connected so closely. They are so close that they are actually one. If we go back hundreds of years to our Celtic ancestors, they had that balance just right. For them God is to be found in our everyday lives. Everything we do is like a breath of God. From the smallest job to the least important task, God is to be found. As we look forward to St Patrick's Day tomorrow, we know that his life is probably the best example of someone who never separated his spirituality from everyday life. For him both were completely connected almost effortlessly. He reminds us beautifully, that the most important event right down to the one that seems almost trivial, we will find God in there too.

It was many years after St. Patrick that we slowly lost this connection. There was an ongoing effort to confine God to a particular place and time. God for example could only be found in huge cathedrals and big churches. It seemed that bigger was better. We began to separate spirituality and our everyday lives. The connection was lost and this has been a huge loss. It was something St Patrick would not have wanted. But if we look at his life, we can see that he never led two separate lives but always one. As we journey through these weeks of Lent and as we look forward to St Patrick's Day, the invitation is to know that God's unique love for us, will be found very much in our everyday lives.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Mar-15
Thought For The Week

'Every Christian is called to experience God's unconditional love working itself out in everyday events. For the young mother, for the fellow afraid of changing careers, for all of us, it's never a question of "prayer life" versus "real life". Saints don't lead two lives but one.' ~Albert Holtz

The biggest mistake we can make when it comes to spiritual matters is to separate our spirituality from our everyday lives. Such a split can never work because both are connected so closely. They are so close that they are actually one. If we go back hundreds of years to our Celtic ancestors, they had that balance just right. For them God is to be found in our everyday lives. Everything we do is like a breath of God. From the smallest job to the least important task, God is to be found. As we look forward to St Patrick's Day this coming week, we know that his life is probably the best example of someone who never separated his spirituality from everyday life. For him both were completely connected almost effortlessly. He reminds us beautifully, that the most important event right down to the one that seems almost trivial, we will find God in there too.

It was many years after St. Patrick that we slowly lost this connection. There was an ongoing effort to confine God to a particular place and time. God for example could only be found in huge cathedrals and big churches. It seemed that bigger was better. We began to separate spirituality and our everyday lives. The connection was lost and this has been a huge loss. It was something St Patrick would not have wanted. But if we look at his life, we can see that he never led two separate lives but always one. As we journey through these weeks of Lent and as we look forward to St Patrick's Day, the invitation is to know that God's unique love for us, will be found very much in our everyday lives.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Mar-14
Thought For The Week

'Every Christian is called to experience God's unconditional love working itself out in everyday events. For the young mother, for the fellow afraid of changing careers, for all of us, it's never a question of "prayer life" versus "real life". Saints don't lead two lives but one.' ~Albert Holtz

The biggest mistake we can make when it comes to spiritual matters is to separate our spirituality from our everyday lives. Such a split can never work because both are connected so closely. They are so close that they are actually one. If we go back hundreds of years to our Celtic ancestors, they had that balance just right. For them God is to be found in our everyday lives. Everything we do is like a breath of God. From the smallest job to the least important task, God is to be found. As we look forward to St Patrick's Day this coming week, we know that his life is probably the best example of someone who never separated his spirituality from everyday life. For him both were completely connected almost effortlessly. He reminds us beautifully, that the most important event right down to the one that seems almost trivial, we will find God in there too.

It was many years after St. Patrick that we slowly lost this connection. There was an ongoing effort to confine God to a particular place and time. God for example could only be found in huge cathedrals and big churches. It seemed that bigger was better. We began to separate spirituality and our everyday lives. The connection was lost and this has been a huge loss. It was something St Patrick would not have wanted. But if we look at his life, we can see that he never led two separate lives but always one. As we journey through these weeks of Lent and as we look forward to St Patrick's Day, the invitation is to know that God's unique love for us, will be found very much in our everyday lives.
 
 
 
  Monday
Mar-13
Thought For The Week

'Every Christian is called to experience God's unconditional love working itself out in everyday events. For the young mother, for the fellow afraid of changing careers, for all of us, it's never a question of "prayer life" versus "real life". Saints don't lead two lives but one.' ~Albert Holtz

The biggest mistake we can make when it comes to spiritual matters is to separate our spirituality from our everyday lives. Such a split can never work because both are connected so closely. They are so close that they are actually one. If we go back hundreds of years to our Celtic ancestors, they had that balance just right. For them God is to be found in our everyday lives. Everything we do is like a breath of God. From the smallest job to the least important task, God is to be found. As we look forward to St Patrick's Day this coming week, we know that his life is probably the best example of someone who never separated his spirituality from everyday life. For him both were completely connected almost effortlessly. He reminds us beautifully, that the most important event right down to the one that seems almost trivial, we will find God in there too.

It was many years after St. Patrick that we slowly lost this connection. There was an ongoing effort to confine God to a particular place and time. God for example could only be found in huge cathedrals and big churches. It seemed that bigger was better. We began to separate spirituality and our everyday lives. The connection was lost and this has been a huge loss. It was something St Patrick would not have wanted. But if we look at his life, we can see that he never led two separate lives but always one. As we journey through these weeks of Lent and as we look forward to St Patrick's Day, the invitation is to know that God's unique love for us, will be found very much in our everyday lives.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Mar-12
Our Thought For Today is by Andy Alexander SJ & Maureen McCann Waldron from the Intercom Magazine

Lent is indeed how God draws us home as individuals, but it is also a very communal journey. We never journey alone, no matter how lonely we may feel. We are always journeying together. If we can experience our journey in communion with others, it makes it so much clearer that we are on a journey together. When we can share our experiences with a close friend or our worship community, we can enjoy support that allows grace to flourish. Let us pray for one another on this journey, especially for those who need and desire a change of heart on this pilgrimage to Easter joy. Choosing and acting Lent are so important because we are body-persons. We experience things with our senses, relish them with our imaginations and we share in God's own creative and loving activity when our hearts and hands work together for and with others.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Mar-11
Thought For The Week

There is a story told about an elderly Chinese woman who had two buckets to carry water, each hung on the ends of a pole which she carried across her back. One of the buckets had been around a while with holes and cracks. The other bucket was perfectly new and always delivered a full portion of water. At the end of the long walk from the stream to the house, the bucket with the holes and cracks arrived only half full.

For a full two years this went on daily, with the woman only bringing home a bucket and a half of water. Of course the perfect bucket was very proud of its accomplishments. But the poor old bucket was ashamed of its own imperfections and felt miserable that it could only do half of what it had been made to do.

After two years of what it perceived to be bitter failure, it spoke to the woman one day by the stream: "I am ashamed of myself because of my cracks and the holes in my side. It causes so much water to leak all the way back to your house." The old woman smiled: "Look underneath you, there are flowers all on your side, but not on the other. I have always known about your flaw, so I planted flower seeds on your side of the path and every day while we walk back you water them. For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate the table. Without you being just the way you are, there would not be this beauty to bless our home."

There the story ends but there is a message in there too. As we journey through Lent, it is a good time to get comfortable with our own cracks and flaws. We all have them, with no exception. Some we can fix but there are some that we will always carry with us. By accepting our own unique cracks and flaws we begin to realize that there is great beauty to be found within us, near us and around us. God is the first one to see this incredible beauty. Lent allows us to begin to see it too.
 
 
 
  Friday
Mar-10
Thought For The Week

There is a story told about an elderly Chinese woman who had two buckets to carry water, each hung on the ends of a pole which she carried across her back. One of the buckets had been around a while with holes and cracks. The other bucket was perfectly new and always delivered a full portion of water. At the end of the long walk from the stream to the house, the bucket with the holes and cracks arrived only half full.

For a full two years this went on daily, with the woman only bringing home a bucket and a half of water. Of course the perfect bucket was very proud of its accomplishments. But the poor old bucket was ashamed of its own imperfections and felt miserable that it could only do half of what it had been made to do.

After two years of what it perceived to be bitter failure, it spoke to the woman one day by the stream: "I am ashamed of myself because of my cracks and the holes in my side. It causes so much water to leak all the way back to your house." The old woman smiled: "Look underneath you, there are flowers all on your side, but not on the other. I have always known about your flaw, so I planted flower seeds on your side of the path and every day while we walk back you water them. For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate the table. Without you being just the way you are, there would not be this beauty to bless our home."

There the story ends but there is a message in there too. As we journey through Lent, it is a good time to get comfortable with our own cracks and flaws. We all have them, with no exception. Some we can fix but there are some that we will always carry with us. By accepting our own unique cracks and flaws we begin to realize that there is great beauty to be found within us, near us and around us. God is the first one to see this incredible beauty. Lent allows us to begin to see it too.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Mar-09
Thought For The Week

There is a story told about an elderly Chinese woman who had two buckets to carry water, each hung on the ends of a pole which she carried across her back. One of the buckets had been around a while with holes and cracks. The other bucket was perfectly new and always delivered a full portion of water. At the end of the long walk from the stream to the house, the bucket with the holes and cracks arrived only half full.

For a full two years this went on daily, with the woman only bringing home a bucket and a half of water. Of course the perfect bucket was very proud of its accomplishments. But the poor old bucket was ashamed of its own imperfections and felt miserable that it could only do half of what it had been made to do.

After two years of what it perceived to be bitter failure, it spoke to the woman one day by the stream: "I am ashamed of myself because of my cracks and the holes in my side. It causes so much water to leak all the way back to your house." The old woman smiled: "Look underneath you, there are flowers all on your side, but not on the other. I have always known about your flaw, so I planted flower seeds on your side of the path and every day while we walk back you water them. For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate the table. Without you being just the way you are, there would not be this beauty to bless our home."

There the story ends but there is a message in there too. As we journey through Lent, it is a good time to get comfortable with our own cracks and flaws. We all have them, with no exception. Some we can fix but there are some that we will always carry with us. By accepting our own unique cracks and flaws we begin to realize that there is great beauty to be found within us, near us and around us. God is the first one to see this incredible beauty. Lent allows us to begin to see it too.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Mar-07
Thought For The Week

There is a story told about an elderly Chinese woman who had two buckets to carry water, each hung on the ends of a pole which she carried across her back. One of the buckets had been around a while with holes and cracks. The other bucket was perfectly new and always delivered a full portion of water. At the end of the long walk from the stream to the house, the bucket with the holes and cracks arrived only half full.

For a full two years this went on daily, with the woman only bringing home a bucket and a half of water. Of course the perfect bucket was very proud of its accomplishments. But the poor old bucket was ashamed of its own imperfections and felt miserable that it could only do half of what it had been made to do.

After two years of what it perceived to be bitter failure, it spoke to the woman one day by the stream: "I am ashamed of myself because of my cracks and the holes in my side. It causes so much water to leak all the way back to your house." The old woman smiled: "Look underneath you, there are flowers all on your side, but not on the other. I have always known about your flaw, so I planted flower seeds on your side of the path and every day while we walk back you water them. For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate the table. Without you being just the way you are, there would not be this beauty to bless our home."

There the story ends but there is a message in there too. As we journey through Lent, it is a good time to get comfortable with our own cracks and flaws. We all have them, with no exception. Some we can fix but there are some that we will always carry with us. By accepting our own unique cracks and flaws we begin to realize that there is great beauty to be found within us, near us and around us. God is the first one to see this incredible beauty. Lent allows us to begin to see it too.
 
 
 
  Monday
Mar-06
Thought For The Week

The story begins with an elderly Chinese woman who had two buckets to carry water, each hung on the ends of a pole which she carried across her back. One of the buckets had been around a while with holes and cracks. The other bucket was perfectly new and always delivered a full portion of water. At the end of the long walk from the stream to the house, the bucket with the holes and cracks arrived only half full.

For a full two years this went on daily, with the woman only bringing home a bucket and a half of water. Of course the perfect bucket was very proud of its accomplishments. But the poor old bucket was ashamed of its own imperfections and felt miserable that it could only do half of what it had been made to do.

After two years of what it perceived to be bitter failure, it spoke to the woman one day by the stream: "I am ashamed of myself because of my cracks and the holes in my side. It causes so much water to leak all the way back to your house." The old woman smiled: "Look underneath you, there are flowers all on your side, but not on the other. I have always known about your flaw, so I planted flower seeds on your side of the path and every day while we walk back you water them. For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate the table. Without you being just the way you are, there would not be this beauty to bless our home."

There the story ends but there is a message in there too. As we journey through Lent, it is a good time to get comfortable with our own cracks and flaws. We all have them, with no exception. Some we can fix but there are some that we will always carry with us. By accepting our own unique cracks and flaws we begin to realize that there is great beauty to be found within us, near us and around us. God is the first one to see this incredible beauty. Lent allows us to begin to see it too.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Mar-05
Thought For Today is by Triona Doherty from the Intercom Magazine

Lent is a time of renewal and new beginnings. It is a time for us to enter into the suffering and death of Jesus, before celebrating the joy and hope of Easter. It is a time to reflect in a special way on God's word. Jesus tells us in today's Gospel that God's words are nourishing - man does not live on bread alone.

Our focus should not only be on earthly things. Lent reminds us that there is more to life than the physical world. We are all guilty of getting caught up in the practicalities of life; it is only natural to work and rush and plan and worry. Lent offers us an opportunity to reflect on what is really important. The sacrifices we make or the extra effort we put in to become better people this Lent are all part of that spiritual journey.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Mar-04
Thought For The Week

"The word 'lent' has different meanings in English. He leant against the wall. She lent me some money. If you're from Cork 'he ran the lent of de field!' The Lent we're talking about means 'springtime', so the emphasis is on growth, on renewal and on new life. Lent is a stretching time, a challenging time, a seasonal reminder of the intrinsically challenging nature of the Christian life.' ~Joseph Cassidy"

We have just celebrated Ash Wednesday and the beginning of our journey through Lent. Many people will have made an effort to visit some church and get blessed with ashes. One church in Co. Galway had a novel approach to Ash Wednesday this year with a drive-thru service at Glenamady church. The approach was put together for people who are busy and on the go. The design of the church grounds allows people to drive in one gate, stop and receive their ashes and then drive out a second gate. It featured on the news and from the report it seems it was an outstanding success. The parish deserves full marks for being creative, for trying something new and at least getting people talking about Ash Wednesday.

So whether it is in a drive-thru, a church or wherever, the most obvious question is why do we put dirty ashes on our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? It is not a good luck charm but an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world. The ashes are a reminder that we are willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Ash Wednesday is not about doom, gloom or negativity. It's a day to celebrate the gift of now and the gift of today. Life may be busy and hectic, but Lent reminds us that we can step back from all the busyness and reflect on our own lives. Like any camera in constant use, we can quite simply be out of focus. Lent will allow us to re focus and to live life in a much more meaningful way.

Lent has been around for many years. It is not an outdated, old fashioned and out of touch event but one that is more relevant and important than it ever was. I hope your Lenten journey for 2017 will be a good one for you.
 
 
 
  Friday
Mar-03
Thought For The Week

"The word 'lent' has different meanings in English. He leant against the wall. She lent me some money. If you're from Cork 'he ran the lent of de field!' The Lent we're talking about means 'springtime', so the emphasis is on growth, on renewal and on new life. Lent is a stretching time, a challenging time, a seasonal reminder of the intrinsically challenging nature of the Christian life.' ~Joseph Cassidy"

We have just celebrated Ash Wednesday and the beginning of our journey through Lent. Many people will have made an effort to visit some church and get blessed with ashes. One church in Co. Galway had a novel approach to Ash Wednesday this year with a drive-thru service at Glenamady church. The approach was put together for people who are busy and on the go. The design of the church grounds allows people to drive in one gate, stop and receive their ashes and then drive out a second gate. It featured on the news and from the report it seems it was an outstanding success. The parish deserves full marks for being creative, for trying something new and at least getting people talking about Ash Wednesday.

So whether it is in a drive-thru, a church or wherever, the most obvious question is why do we put dirty ashes on our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? It is not a good luck charm but an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world. The ashes are a reminder that we are willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Ash Wednesday is not about doom, gloom or negativity. It's a day to celebrate the gift of now and the gift of today. Life may be busy and hectic, but Lent reminds us that we can step back from all the busyness and reflect on our own lives. Like any camera in constant use, we can quite simply be out of focus. Lent will allow us to re focus and to live life in a much more meaningful way.

Lent has been around for many years. It is not an outdated, old fashioned and out of touch event but one that is more relevant and important than it ever was. I hope your Lenten journey for 2017 will be a good one for you.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Mar-02
Thought For The Week

"The word 'lent' has different meanings in English. He leant against the wall. She lent me some money. If you're from Cork 'he ran the lent of de field!' The Lent we're talking about means 'springtime', so the emphasis is on growth, on renewal and on new life. Lent is a stretching time, a challenging time, a seasonal reminder of the intrinsically challenging nature of the Christian life.' ~Joseph Cassidy"

We celebrated Ash Wednesday yesterday and the beginning of our journey through Lent. Many people will make an effort to visit some church and get blessed with ashes. One church in Co. Galway had a novel approach to Ash Wednesday this year with a drive-thru service at Glenamady church. The approach was put together for people who are busy and on the go. The design of the church grounds allows people to drive in one gate, stop and receive their ashes and then drive out a second gate. It featured on the news last night and from the report it seems it was an outstanding success. The parish deserves full marks for being creative, for trying something new and at least getting people talking about Ash Wednesday.

So whether it is in a drive-thru, a church or wherever, the most obvious question is why do we put dirty ashes on our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? It is not a good luck charm but an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world. The ashes are a reminder that we are willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Ash Wednesday is not about doom, gloom or negativity. It's a day to celebrate the gift of now and the gift of today. Life may be busy and hectic, but Lent reminds us that we can step back from all the busyness and reflect on our own lives. Like any camera in constant use, we can quite simply be out of focus. Lent will allow us to re focus and to live life in a much more meaningful way.

Lent has been around for many years. It is not an outdated, old fashioned and out of touch event but one that is more relevant and important than it ever was. I hope your Lenten journey for 2017 will be a good one for you.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Mar-01
Thought For The Week

"The word 'lent' has different meanings in English. He leant against the wall. She lent me some money. If you're from Cork 'he ran the lent of de field!' The Lent we're talking about means 'springtime', so the emphasis is on growth, on renewal and on new life. Lent is a stretching time, a challenging time, a seasonal reminder of the intrinsically challenging nature of the Christian life.' ~Joseph Cassidy"

We celebrate Ash Wednesday today and the beginning of our journey through Lent. Many people will make an effort to visit some church and get blessed with ashes. One church in Co. Galway is taking a novel approach to Ash Wednesday this year with a drive-thru service available at Glenamady church. The approach has been put together for people who are busy and on the go. The design of the church grounds will allow people to drive in one gate, stop and receive their ashes and then drive out a second gate. Some might say this is all a bit tacky but the parish deserve full marks for being creative, for trying something new and at least getting people talking about Ash Wednesday.

So whether it is in a drive-thru, a church or wherever, the most obvious question is why do we put dirty ashes on our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? It is not a good luck charm but an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world. The ashes are a reminder that we are willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Ash Wednesday is not about doom, gloom or negativity. It's a day to celebrate the gift of now and the gift of today. Life may be busy and hectic, but Lent reminds us that we can step back from all the busyness and reflect on our own lives. Like any camera in constant use, we can quite simply be out of focus. Lent will allow us to re focus and to live life in a much more meaningful way.

Lent has been around for many years. It is not an outdated, old fashioned and out of touch event but one that is more relevant and important than it ever was. I hope your Lenten journey for 2017 will be a good one for you.
 
 

 

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