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Listing February - 2020
 
  Saturday
Feb-29
'Prayer begins with you. Start where you are and stay with it. God is with you as you are and does not expect you to be any other than you are.' ~Mary Luke Tobin

Today is Feb 29th and this year we mark a leap year. A leap year is added to our calendar to keep it working properly. The earth travels around the sun in one year but in fact it takes a little longer, 365 1/4 days. The Leap year every four years corrects this. The chances of being born in a Leap year are 1 in 1500. Any year that can be divided by 4 is a Leap Year. A woman can propose to her partner today.

Of course for anyone whose birthday is today, it is indeed a special day. For all of us we too need to correct ourselves on occasions. We steer off course, we lose focus, we drift and particularly when it comes to spiritual matters. It is good to recheck and get going again. Thankfully with God we don't have to wait every four years!

Every time we set aside a moment of prayer is our chance to reconnect spiritually. The journey of Lent which we have just begun, is a chance to create more space in our busy lives for some quiet moments of prayer. We sometimes feel such moments of prayer must be long and extended to have any value. This is not the case and often shorter is so much better.

Prayer is when we connect to the energy of God that is all around us. Sometimes we are very much aware of the presence of God in our lives and sometimes it just doesn't happen. The best starting point is to know that God is with us where we are right now. Whatever is going on for us right now is the most important moment to start with and stay with.

This calls for honesty. It pulls in a whole range of feelings of where we might be right now, from content, upset, angry, anxious, unsure, scared, happy, sad, fulfilled, stressed, hopeful or whatever. Honesty in prayer and saying what's going on for us right now is so precious. Having shared the honest moment means that the prayer has not been a waste of time. What a pity if this only happened every four years. But when we can weave these short little moments of prayer into our daily routine, we are connecting to the energy or presence of God all around us. This is a good place to be.
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-28
Thought For The Week

'Every moment of life is different from the last and yet every moment is entwined with what came before it. What will succeed it, whether we can perceive it or not; is that every moment counts because we can contribute to how that moment will be.' ~Niamh Brennan

The ghost ship 'MV Alta' made lots of headlines last week. For over 18 months it floated abandoned and unmanned across the Atlantic Ocean. It crossed through major shipping lanes but didn't seem to be bothering anybody. Then a week ago Storm Dennis pushed it right up through the Atlantic until it crashed onto rocks near Ballycotton. It is a story that became viral featuring on nearly every news bulletin across the world.

It's original journey with crew, had been from Greece to Haiti but the crew had to abandon the ship because of another storm. So from mid-Atlantic it drifted south towards South America, then east towards Africa and then straight up west of Spain, Portugal and France until it crashed into Ireland from the force of Storm Dennis.

In that time it has travelled and drifted thousands of nautical miles. It must have been tossed and thrown around through many storms. It must have drifted silently too in sometimes occasional still waters. But all the while it was moving in some direction. There is much debate as to what will happen to the ship now.

Today Ash Wednesday ,when it is put beside the ship has a spiritual message too. We sometimes drift aimlessly through life as well. We tend to be busy and fill up our days with lots of stuff. But we are so busy that sometimes there is no time for the really important things in life. We are all over the place, without direction, without an anchor, without grounding and it can feel as if life has no meaning and that everything is seemingly random.

But as believers from a faith background we know that life is more than random. We believe that God is the one who brings us meaning, direction and hope. With a belief in God we can feel a definite sense of purpose to life. Whatever direction life takes us, we feel encouraged, energised and ready to face each day as best we can. Lent is a lovely opportunity to stop the drift, to put the anchor down, to reflect on our life and see what positive change could help us feel more connected and grounded in life.

All the spiritual writers would say that this will not happen unless we give it some consideration and reflection. One day or two days is never enough. But the full journey of Lent is so full of opportunity, reflection and surprise. It is also a unique opportunity to make the most of the present moment, God's very special gift to each of us.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-27
Thought For The Week

'Every moment of life is different from the last and yet every moment is entwined with what came before it. What will succeed it, whether we can perceive it or not; is that every moment counts because we can contribute to how that moment will be.' ~Niamh Brennan

The ghost ship 'MV Alta' made lots of headlines last week. For over 18 months it floated abandoned and unmanned across the Atlantic Ocean. It crossed through major shipping lanes but didn't seem to be bothering anybody. Then a week ago Storm Dennis pushed it right up through the Atlantic until it crashed onto rocks near Ballycotton. It is a story that became viral featuring on nearly every news bulletin across the world.

It's original journey with crew, had been from Greece to Haiti but the crew had to abandon the ship because of another storm. So from mid-Atlantic it drifted south towards South America, then east towards Africa and then straight up west of Spain, Portugal and France until it crashed into Ireland from the force of Storm Dennis.

In that time it has travelled and drifted thousands of nautical miles. It must have been tossed and thrown around through many storms. It must have drifted silently too in sometimes occasional still waters. But all the while it was moving in some direction. There is much debate as to what will happen to the ship now.

Today Ash Wednesday ,when it is put beside the ship has a spiritual message too. We sometimes drift aimlessly through life as well. We tend to be busy and fill up our days with lots of stuff. But we are so busy that sometimes there is no time for the really important things in life. We are all over the place, without direction, without an anchor, without grounding and it can feel as if life has no meaning and that everything is seemingly random.

But as believers from a faith background we know that life is more than random. We believe that God is the one who brings us meaning, direction and hope. With a belief in God we can feel a definite sense of purpose to life. Whatever direction life takes us, we feel encouraged, energised and ready to face each day as best we can. Lent is a lovely opportunity to stop the drift, to put the anchor down, to reflect on our life and see what positive change could help us feel more connected and grounded in life.

All the spiritual writers would say that this will not happen unless we give it some consideration and reflection. One day or two days is never enough. But the full journey of Lent is so full of opportunity, reflection and surprise. It is also a unique opportunity to make the most of the present moment, God's very special gift to each of us.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-26
Thought For The Week

'Every moment of life is different from the last and yet every moment is entwined with what came before it. What will succeed it, whether we can perceive it or not; is that every moment counts because we can contribute to how that moment will be.' ~Niamh Brennan

The ghost ship 'MV Alta' made lots of headlines last week. For over 18 months it floated abandoned and unmanned across the Atlantic Ocean. It crossed through major shipping lanes but didn't seem to be bothering anybody. Then a week ago Storm Dennis pushed it right up through the Atlantic until it crashed onto rocks near Ballycotton. It is a story that became viral featuring on nearly every news bulletin across the world.

It's original journey with crew, had been from Greece to Haiti but the crew had to abandon the ship because of another storm. So from mid-Atlantic it drifted south towards South America, then east towards Africa and then straight up west of Spain, Portugal and France until it crashed into Ireland from the force of Storm Dennis.

In that time it has travelled and drifted thousands of nautical miles. It must have been tossed and thrown around through many storms. It must have drifted silently too in sometimes occasional still waters. But all the while it was moving in some direction. There is much debate as to what will happen to the ship now.

Today Ash Wednesday ,when it is put beside the ship has a spiritual message too. We sometimes drift aimlessly through life as well. We tend to be busy and fill up our days with lots of stuff. But we are so busy that sometimes there is no time for the really important things in life. We are all over the place, without direction, without an anchor, without grounding and it can feel as if life has no meaning and that everything is seemingly random.

But as believers from a faith background we know that life is more than random. We believe that God is the one who brings us meaning, direction and hope. With a belief in God we can feel a definite sense of purpose to life. Whatever direction life takes us, we feel encouraged, energised and ready to face each day as best we can. Lent is a lovely opportunity to stop the drift, to put the anchor down, to reflect on our life and see what positive change could help us feel more connected and grounded in life.

All the spiritual writers would say that this will not happen unless we give it some consideration and reflection. One day or two days is never enough. But the full journey of Lent is so full of opportunity, reflection and surprise. It is also a unique opportunity to make the most of the present moment, God's very special gift to each of us.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-25
Thought For The Week

'Every moment of life is different from the last and yet every moment is entwined with what came before it. What will succeed it, whether we can perceive it or not; is that every moment counts because we can contribute to how that moment will be.' ~Niamh Brennan

The ghost ship 'MV Alta' made lots of headlines last week. For over 18 months it floated abandoned and unmanned across the Atlantic Ocean. It crossed through major shipping lanes but didn't seem to be bothering anybody. Then a week ago Storm Dennis pushed it right up through the Atlantic until it crashed onto rocks near Ballycotton. It is a story that became viral featuring on nearly every news bulletin across the world.

It's original journey with crew, had been from Greece to Haiti but the crew had to abandon the ship because of another storm. So from mid-Atlantic it drifted south towards South America, then east towards Africa and then straight up west of Spain, Portugal and France until it crashed into Ireland from the force of Storm Dennis.

In that time it has travelled and drifted thousands of nautical miles. It must have been tossed and thrown around through many storms. It must have drifted silently too in sometimes occasional still waters. But all the while it was moving in some direction. There is much debate as to what will happen to the ship now.

But as we approach Ash Wednesday during the week, the ship has a spiritual message too. We sometimes drift aimlessly through life as well. We tend to be busy and fill up our days with lots of stuff. But we are so busy that sometimes there is no time for the really important things in life. We are all over the place, without direction, without an anchor, without grounding and it can feel as if life has no meaning and that everything is seemingly random.

But as believers from a faith background we know that life is more than random. We believe that God is the one who brings us meaning, direction and hope. With a belief in God we can feel a definite sense of purpose to life. Whatever direction life takes us, we feel encouraged, energised and ready to face each day as best we can. Lent is a lovely opportunity to stop the drift, to put the anchor down, to reflect on our life and see what positive change could help us feel more connected and grounded in life.

All the spiritual writers would say that this will not happen unless we give it some consideration and reflection. One day or two days is never enough. But the full journey of Lent is so full of opportunity, reflection and surprise. It is also a unique opportunity to make the most of the present moment, God's very special gift to each of us.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-23
Little Jenny was afraid of the dark so her Mum kept a night light burning in her room. One night the light burned out and left Jenny to face the darkness. The next morning at breakfast, Jenny told her Mum what happened, "It was scary at first. I almost called to you. But then I remembered what you told me, that I was a light myself."

We all have to face some darkness in our lives. It cannot be avoided. The first crucial step is to always remember that we are indeed light ourselves. Our faith reminds us that the darkest corners of our lives are never completely dark. There is always some glimmer of hope and some flicker of light. Today I thank God for that flicker of light and hope. It may not seem much but without it we are indeed in darkness.
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-21
Thought For The Week

'Sickness is one of the real things of life and the manner in which we address sickness tells us something of what we think of life.' ~Archbishop Diarmuid Martin

We tend to push sickness to one side so that we can concentrate on the real things of life. Sickness has and will always be a part of life. The funeral took place of Keelin Shanley during the week. She was a much loved journalist and newsreader who worked with RTE for many years. Her battle with cancer is a reminder how sickness can affect anyone at any time.

Last week we also celebrated World Day For Sick people. It is an awareness day and a prayer day, that coincides with the feast day of Our Lady of Lourdes on Feb 11th. Prayers were said in many churches on that day for our sick. Such an event is not random or done in isolation.

It is a recognition that for many sick people, their world has been turned upside down. It is not an easy time or an easy journey for them. We walk in solidarity with them holding the light of hope and healing. We don't have all the answers or the words but we are willing to hold the light. This light can make all the difference and it shows how genuine love, care and concern is what really matters.

Jesus spent much of his time with sick people. He didn't preach to them or never told them to 'offer it up'. His miracles with sick people were not done to show off. His down to earth humanity, love and compassion is a reminder that he cared deeply about those who were sick. He reminded them of their dignity and that even in their darkest hour he would be with them. Nothing has changed. Every sickness is uniquely personal, a challenge and an opportunity. We pray for all our sick and for all who give of their time, love and energy in looking after each person.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-19
Thought For The Week

'Sickness is one of the real things of life and the manner in which we address sickness tells us something of what we think of life.' ~Archbishop Diarmuid Martin

We tend to push sickness to one side so that we can concentrate on the real things of life. Sickness has and will always be a part of life. The funeral took place of Keelin Shanley during the week. She was a much loved journalist and newsreader who worked with RTE for many years. Her battle with cancer is a reminder how sickness can affect anyone at any time.

During the week we also celebrated World Day For Sick people. It is an awareness day and a prayer day, that coincides with the feast day of Our Lady of Lourdes on Feb 11th. Prayers were said in many churches on that day for our sick. Such an event is not random or done in isolation.

It is a recognition that for many sick people, their world has been turned upside down. It is not an easy time or an easy journey for them. We walk in solidarity with them holding the light of hope and healing. We don't have all the answers or the words but we are willing to hold the light. This light can make all the difference and it shows how genuine love, care and concern is what really matters.

Jesus spent much of his time with sick people. He didn't preach to them or never told them to 'offer it up'. His miracles with sick people were not done to show off. His down to earth humanity, love and compassion is a reminder that he cared deeply about those who were sick. He reminded them of their dignity and that even in their darkest hour he would be with them. Nothing has changed. Every sickness is uniquely personal, a challenge and an opportunity. We pray for all our sick and for all who give of their time, love and energy in looking after each person.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-18
Thought For The Week

'Sickness is one of the real things of life and the manner in which we address sickness tells us something of what we think of life.' ~Archbishop Diarmuid Martin

We tend to push sickness to one side so that we can concentrate on the real things of life. Sickness has and will always be a part of life. The funeral took place of Keelin Shanley during the week. She was a much loved journalist and newsreader who worked with RTE for many years. Her battle with cancer is a reminder how sickness can affect anyone at any time.

During the week we also celebrated World Day For Sick people. It is an awareness day and a prayer day, that coincides with the feast day of Our Lady of Lourdes on Feb 11th. Prayers were said in many churches on that day for our sick. Such an event is not random or done in isolation.

It is a recognition that for many sick people, their world has been turned upside down. It is not an easy time or an easy journey for them. We walk in solidarity with them holding the light of hope and healing. We don't have all the answers or the words but we are willing to hold the light. This light can make all the difference and it shows how genuine love, care and concern is what really matters.

Jesus spent much of his time with sick people. He didn't preach to them or never told them to 'offer it up'. His miracles with sick people were not done to show off. His down to earth humanity, love and compassion is a reminder that he cared deeply about those who were sick. He reminded them of their dignity and that even in their darkest hour he would be with them. Nothing has changed. Every sickness is uniquely personal, a challenge and an opportunity. We pray for all our sick and for all who give of their time, love and energy in looking after each person.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-16
Thought For The Week

'Inside of our marriages, families, churches, friendships and places of work we cannot promise that we won't disappoint each other. But we can promise that we won't walk away because of disappointment and hurt.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Election Day in Ireland last Saturday, was the main story across Ireland for a few days. The long wait is finally over for our politicians and their followers. Democracy has a powerful voice because people have had their say. As the drama of the election unfolded, there were celebrations but also disappointments too.

Disappointments are part and parcel of life. Any attempt on our behalf to try and completely avoid disappointments will never work. The world we live in today strives for perfection and there is little room allowed for mistakes, disappointments and failure. The biggest stumbling block in many things we do each day is striving for perfection and trying to get everything right.

A key area in working with young people is to help them deal with mistakes, disappointments and failure. Their world often crumbles when faced with disappointments and failure. Their resilience levels have lowered compared to previous generations. They cannot be blamed for this entirely. As we know society has put young people under a lot of pressure because of high expectations and technology developments, especially in the whole area of social media.

When we set incredibly highs standards and when we expect a lot from others we are going to be disappointed. No person is the complete package. We do let each other down. Disappointments and hurt are an intricate part of life. They can't be avoided. The only response is to be there for each other.

In our Gospel stories we see how Jesus recognised how people get burdened with problems, hurts and disappointments. One of his most famous and beautiful lines is: "Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened and I will give you rest." In our failures, setbacks, uncertainties and disappointments we need support, reassurance, and encouragement. We need to be told "It's ok", and especially to be told this during our darkest hour and darkest moments.

Our prayer this weekend is: "Lord, we ask you to be with us through the many events of our daily lives. We especially ask you to be with us during our difficulties and disappointments too. Help us to feel your light and love. Help us to know you are close and near to us always. Amen."
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-15
'Time is too slow for those who wait, too swift for those who fear, too long for those who grieve, too short for those who rejoice, but for those who love, time is eternity.' ~Henry Van Dyke

Some will say Valentine's Day is a load of hype and completely built up into something way too big. Despite the commercial side of the day, it is good to set aside at least one day to genuinely show someone we love and care. Routine and life's daily challenges keep us firmly focussed. But sometimes we forget and take for granted those who really matter. Life is far too short to forget those who really matter to us. Today is a day when we can show someone how much they really mean to us. We thank God for that someone special in our lives. We all fall well short in living up to be the perfect husband, wife, partner, friend, carer or whatever word best sums up our situation. But we make an honest effort in bringing the best out of the person who means the world to us.

Today we say thank you for the great blessings that genuine love can bring. For some today is a sad day because that someone special may have died or may just not be there. We remember them too today. We also remember most importantly how true love always has its roots in God. We celebrate on St Valentine's Day God's unique love for us. We are valuable because God loves us and nothing or no person can ever take that from any of us.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-13
Thought For The Week

'Inside of our marriages, families, churches, friendships and places of work we cannot promise that we won't disappoint each other. But we can promise that we won't walk away because of disappointment and hurt.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Election Day in Ireland last Saturday, was the main story across Ireland for a few days. The long wait is finally over for our politicians and their followers. Democracy has a powerful voice because people have had their say. As the drama of the election unfolded, there were celebrations but also disappointments too.

Disappointments are part and parcel of life. Any attempt on our behalf to try and completely avoid disappointments will never work. The world we live in today strives for perfection and there is little room allowed for mistakes, disappointments and failure. The biggest stumbling block in many things we do each day is striving for perfection and trying to get everything right.

A key area in working with young people is to help them deal with mistakes, disappointments and failure. Their world often crumbles when faced with disappointments and failure. Their resilience levels have lowered compared to previous generations. They cannot be blamed for this entirely. As we know society has put young people under a lot of pressure because of high expectations and technology developments, especially in the whole area of social media.

When we set incredibly highs standards and when we expect a lot from others we are going to be disappointed. No person is the complete package. We do let each other down. Disappointments and hurt are an intricate part of life. They can't be avoided. The only response is to be there for each other.

In our Gospel stories we see how Jesus recognised how people get burdened with problems, hurts and disappointments. One of his most famous and beautiful lines is: "Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened and I will give you rest." In our failures, setbacks, uncertainties and disappointments we need support, reassurance, and encouragement. We need to be told "It's ok", and especially to be told this during our darkest hour and darkest moments.

Our prayer this weekend is: "Lord, we ask you to be with us through the many events of our daily lives. We especially ask you to be with us during our difficulties and disappointments too. Help us to feel your light and love. Help us to know you are close and near to us always. Amen."
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-12
Thought For The Week

'Inside of our marriages, families, churches, friendships and places of work we cannot promise that we won't disappoint each other. But we can promise that we won't walk away because of disappointment and hurt.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Election Day in Ireland last Saturday, was the main story across Ireland for a few days. The long wait is finally over for our politicians and their followers. Democracy has a powerful voice because people have had their say. As the drama of the election unfolded, there were celebrations but also disappointments too.

Disappointments are part and parcel of life. Any attempt on our behalf to try and completely avoid disappointments will never work. The world we live in today strives for perfection and there is little room allowed for mistakes, disappointments and failure. The biggest stumbling block in many things we do each day is striving for perfection and trying to get everything right.

A key area in working with young people is to help them deal with mistakes, disappointments and failure. Their world often crumbles when faced with disappointments and failure. Their resilience levels have lowered compared to previous generations. They cannot be blamed for this entirely. As we know society has put young people under a lot of pressure because of high expectations and technology developments, especially in the whole area of social media.

When we set incredibly highs standards and when we expect a lot from others we are going to be disappointed. No person is the complete package. We do let each other down. Disappointments and hurt are an intricate part of life. They can't be avoided. The only response is to be there for each other.

In our Gospel stories we see how Jesus recognised how people get burdened with problems, hurts and disappointments. One of his most famous and beautiful lines is: "Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened and I will give you rest." In our failures, setbacks, uncertainties and disappointments we need support, reassurance, and encouragement. We need to be told "It's ok", and especially to be told this during our darkest hour and darkest moments.

Our prayer this weekend is: "Lord, we ask you to be with us through the many events of our daily lives. We especially ask you to be with us during our difficulties and disappointments too. Help us to feel your light and love. Help us to know you are close and near to us always. Amen."
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-11
Thought For The Week

'Inside of our marriages, families, churches, friendships and places of work we cannot promise that we won't disappoint each other. But we can promise that we won't walk away because of disappointment and hurt.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Election Day in Ireland last Saturday, was the main story across Ireland over the weekend. The long wait is finally over for our politicians and their followers. Democracy has a powerful voice because people have had their say. As the drama of the election unfolds, there will be celebrations but also disappointments too.

Disappointments are part and parcel of life. Any attempt on our behalf to try and completely avoid disappointments will never work. The world we live in today strives for perfection and there is little room allowed for mistakes, disappointments and failure. The biggest stumbling block in many things we do each day is striving for perfection and trying to get everything right.

A key area in working with young people is to help them deal with mistakes, disappointments and failure. Their world often crumbles when faced with disappointments and failure. Their resilience levels have lowered compared to previous generations. They cannot be blamed for this entirely. As we know society has put young people under a lot of pressure because of high expectations and technology developments, especially in the whole area of social media.

When we set incredibly highs standards and when we expect a lot from others we are going to be disappointed. No person is the complete package. We do let each other down. Disappointments and hurt are an intricate part of life. They can't be avoided. The only response is to be there for each other.

In our Gospel stories we see how Jesus recognised how people get burdened with problems, hurts and disappointments. One of his most famous and beautiful lines is: "Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened and I will give you rest." In our failures, setbacks, uncertainties and disappointments we need support, reassurance, and encouragement. We need to be told "It's ok", and especially to be told this during our darkest hour and darkest moments.

Our prayer this weekend is: "Lord, we ask you to be with us through the many events of our daily lives. We especially ask you to be with us during our difficulties and disappointments too. Help us to feel your light and love. Help us to know you are close and near to us always. Amen."
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-10
Thought For The Week

'Inside of our marriages, families, churches, friendships and places of work we cannot promise that we won't disappoint each other. But we can promise that we won't walk away because of disappointment and hurt.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Election Day in Ireland last Saturday, was the main story across Ireland over the weekend. The long wait is finally over for our politicians and their followers. Democracy has a powerful voice because people have had their say. As the drama of the election unfolds, there will be celebrations but also disappointments too.

Disappointments are part and parcel of life. Any attempt on our behalf to try and completely avoid disappointments will never work. The world we live in today strives for perfection and there is little room allowed for mistakes, disappointments and failure. The biggest stumbling block in many things we do each day is striving for perfection and trying to get everything right.

A key area in working with young people is to help them deal with mistakes, disappointments and failure. Their world often crumbles when faced with disappointments and failure. Their resilience levels have lowered compared to previous generations. They cannot be blamed for this entirely. As we know society has put young people under a lot of pressure because of high expectations and technology developments, especially in the whole area of social media.

When we set incredibly highs standards and when we expect a lot from others we are going to be disappointed. No person is the complete package. We do let each other down. Disappointments and hurt are an intricate part of life. They can't be avoided. The only response is to be there for each other.

In our Gospel stories we see how Jesus recognised how people get burdened with problems, hurts and disappointments. One of his most famous and beautiful lines is: "Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened and I will give you rest." In our failures, setbacks, uncertainties and disappointments we need support, reassurance, and encouragement. We need to be told "It's ok", and especially to be told this during our darkest hour and darkest moments.

Our prayer this weekend is: "Lord, we ask you to be with us through the many events of our daily lives. We especially ask you to be with us during our difficulties and disappointments too. Help us to feel your light and love. Help us to know you are close and near to us always. Amen."
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-09
'Guard well your spare moment's. They are like uncut diamonds. Discard them and their value will never be known. Improve them and they will become the brightest gems.' ~Ralph Waldo Emerson

If we only say "I never have a spare moment" then we really have pushed ourselves to the limits. Such is the hectic pace of life that spare moments are often squeezed out. This is a pity. We are the losers if this happens to us. Spare moments are ours to do what we want and where we want. We can discard them, we can waste them but they are ours to make the most of.

Spare moments can be used for quiet reflection, for prayer, for a walk, for rest, for a word of thanks or encouragement. When used in this way they are indeed gems. A spare moment just to be still is also a gem. They are ours to hold and to use. How are you going to use yours today?
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-08
Thought For The Week

'The saddest summary of a life contains three descriptions: could have, might have and should have.' ~Louis E. Boone

Last Saturday (Feb 1st) was the feast of St Brigid. In Ireland it is a significant feast day as we celebrate the achievements of a remarkable woman. Born in 454 she is famous for her hospitality, her generosity, her concern for the poor, her ability to stand up to those in authority and her unique ability to get what she wanted.

So instead of could have, might have and should have, Brigid just did it! She spoke a message to people who felt lost and alienated. Her message and her voice of hope are so relevant for today and 2020. Her relevance and importance is probably greater than it ever has been. It is time to give Brigid the spotlight she so richly deserves.

She is most famous for her St. Brigid's cross which she wove together using rushes. The many strands that make up a St. Brigid's cross represent the different strands of our own lives. They pick up on our joys and blessings but also on our struggles, problems and difficulties. She weaved them all uniquely together. The key message from her cross is that nothing in life is in isolation. Everything is connected and together. Joys and blessings go hand and hand with challenges and difficulties. They are all mixed together. This is the way life is, it is the way it always has been and it is the way it will continue to be.

Brigid's message is that God is present in this mix too, holding everything together. The message is loud and clear, that God is not the cause of struggles, problems or difficulties but rather the one who helps and guides us through them. As we work our way through them we find and experience the good moments too. We sometimes call them blessings and without them life would be so dull and dark.

The message of Brigid can be summed as follows: live life to the full, be yourself, do your best, expect everything and anything, know that you are always loved and to know that God is there to guide and direct you. Don't give up when it is easy to do so, keep trying, believe in yourself, nothing is in isolation and everything is connected. In all the connections God is always near and close to you. Such a message seems so relevant for the world of 2020 and especially relevant for how we live today.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-05
Thought For The Week

'The saddest summary of a life contains three descriptions: could have, might have and should have.' ~Louis E. Boone

Last Saturday (Feb 1st) was the feast of St Brigid. In Ireland it is a significant feast day as we celebrate the achievements of a remarkable woman. Born in 454 she is famous for her hospitality, her generosity, her concern for the poor, her ability to stand up to those in authority and her unique ability to get what she wanted.

So instead of could have, might have and should have, Brigid just did it! She spoke a message to people who felt lost and alienated. Her message and her voice of hope are so relevant for today and 2020. Her relevance and importance is probably greater than it ever has been. It is time to give Brigid the spotlight she so richly deserves.

She is most famous for her St. Brigid's cross which she wove together using rushes. The many strands that make up a St. Brigid's cross represent the different strands of our own lives. They pick up on our joys and blessings but also on our struggles, problems and difficulties. She weaved them all uniquely together. The key message from her cross is that nothing in life is in isolation. Everything is connected and together. Joys and blessings go hand and hand with challenges and difficulties. They are all mixed together. This is the way life is, it is the way it always has been and it is the way it will continue to be.

Brigid's message is that God is present in this mix too, holding everything together. The message is loud and clear, that God is not the cause of struggles, problems or difficulties but rather the one who helps and guides us through them. As we work our way through them we find and experience the good moments too. We sometimes call them blessings and without them life would be so dull and dark.

The message of Brigid can be summed as follows: live life to the full, be yourself, do your best, expect everything and anything, know that you are always loved and to know that God is there to guide and direct you. Don't give up when it is easy to do so, keep trying, believe in yourself, nothing is in isolation and everything is connected. In all the connections God is always near and close to you. Such a message seems so relevant for the world of 2020 and especially relevant for how we live today.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-04
As a school chaplain I am very much aware of the wonderful work teachers do faithfully, day in - day out. The role is often misunderstood on the outside with the repeated line: "They have it so handy - look at all the holidays they get." Despite this many parents and students appreciate what their teachers do in school and the classroom. It is a combination of dedication, commitment, creativity, patience, enthusiasm, listening, encouragement and willingness to do ones best each day. Many of our schools are so lucky to have teachers who do this and much more besides. The following reflection is a prayer put together by a teacher called: 'I believe, Lord.'

I believe that each of my students is your child. I believe that they are a reflection of your love.
I believe that each child possesses special gifts and talents. I believe that you are entrusting me to help them discover these gifts and nurture those talents.
I believe that each child is trying to find you, and that I can be a model of how to look, how to live, how to pray.
I believe that my job is actually a mission, a ministry; that you have chosen me in this time and in this place to be there for these young people.
I believe that there is nothing haphazard about my day, about my experiences with my students or with their parents. It is all part of your plan.
I believe that you have chosen me, Lord. I believe.
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-03
Thought For The Week

'The saddest summary of a life contains three descriptions: could have, might have and should have.' ~Louis E. Boone

Last Saturday (Feb 1st) was the feast of St Brigid. In Ireland it is a significant feast day as we celebrate the achievements of a remarkable woman. Born in 454 she is famous for her hospitality, her generosity, her concern for the poor, her ability to stand up to those in authority and her unique ability to get what she wanted.

So instead of could have, might have and should have, Brigid just did it! She spoke a message to people who felt lost and alienated. Her message and her voice of hope are so relevant for today and 2020. Her relevance and importance is probably greater than it ever has been. It is time to give Brigid the spotlight she so richly deserves.

She is most famous for her St. Brigid's cross which she wove together using rushes. The many strands that make up a St. Brigid's cross represent the different strands of our own lives. They pick up on our joys and blessings but also on our struggles, problems and difficulties. She weaved them all uniquely together. The key message from her cross is that nothing in life is in isolation. Everything is connected and together. Joys and blessings go hand and hand with challenges and difficulties. They are all mixed together. This is the way life is, it is the way it always has been and it is the way it will continue to be.

Brigid's message is that God is present in this mix too, holding everything together. The message is loud and clear, that God is not the cause of struggles, problems or difficulties but rather the one who helps and guides us through them. As we work our way through them we find and experience the good moments too. We sometimes call them blessings and without them life would be so dull and dark.

The message of Brigid can be summed as follows: live life to the full, be yourself, do your best, expect everything and anything, know that you are always loved and to know that God is there to guide and direct you. Don't give up when it is easy to do so, keep trying, believe in yourself, nothing is in isolation and everything is connected. In all the connections God is always near and close to you. Such a message seems so relevant for the world of 2020 and especially relevant for how we live today.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-02
Thought For The Week

'We are easily controlled by the voice of our insignificance. This is the illusion that we fall victim to when a small, dark fraction of our lives becomes the whole picture we see of ourselves.' ~Peter Hannah

We are often so hard on ourselves. We are our own worst enemy. We allow something small and insignificant to dominate our lives. Every person has a small fraction of their lives that is dark. We then waste endless time and energy allowing it to dominate our lives. Sometimes it takes over our lives clouding us in depression, sadness and guilt.

We can even allow it blot out God's love for us. This should never happen. We think we are unworthy because we have allowed a pebble become a huge rock in our lives. It's time to go back holding the pebble again and let the rock go. There is great freedom in letting the rock go.

Last Saturday (Jan 25th) was the feast day of the conversion of St Paul. If we talk about pebbles and rocks then his life was a heap of rocks. We know he was hard, cold and often ruthless in what he did. He had no time for compassion or kindness. So when he did a major U-turn in his life, it seemed beyond belief and beyond comprehension. But that is what happened. He let all the rocks go and went about spreading the good news of Jesus.

The changes St Paul made may have been dramatic and beyond our experience but we too can begin to celebrate our good news. There are rocks in our lives that we can also let go of. What is the point in dragging them around with us each day?

There is great freedom in celebrating our story, celebrating our good news, celebrating the many down to earth and ordinary moments of our everyday lives. Once we start this journey, we will begin to understand how small pebbles are so much better than the rocks. Every rock we can let go of brings with it a freedom and hopefully new beginnings.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-01
Thought For The Week

'We are easily controlled by the voice of our insignificance. This is the illusion that we fall victim to when a small, dark fraction of our lives becomes the whole picture we see of ourselves.' ~Peter Hannah

We are often so hard on ourselves. We are our own worst enemy. We allow something small and insignificant to dominate our lives. Every person has a small fraction of their lives that is dark. We then waste endless time and energy allowing it to dominate our lives. Sometimes it takes over our lives clouding us in depression, sadness and guilt.

We can even allow it blot out God's love for us. This should never happen. We think we are unworthy because we have allowed a pebble become a huge rock in our lives. It's time to go back holding the pebble again and let the rock go. There is great freedom in letting the rock go.

Last Saturday (Jan 25th) was the feast day of the conversion of St Paul. If we talk about pebbles and rocks then his life was a heap of rocks. We know he was hard, cold and often ruthless in what he did. He had no time for compassion or kindness. So when he did a major U-turn in his life, it seemed beyond belief and beyond comprehension. But that is what happened. He let all the rocks go and went about spreading the good news of Jesus.

The changes St Paul made may have been dramatic and beyond our experience but we too can begin to celebrate our good news. There are rocks in our lives that we can also let go of. What is the point in dragging them around with us each day?

There is great freedom in celebrating our story, celebrating our good news, celebrating the many down to earth and ordinary moments of our everyday lives. Once we start this journey, we will begin to understand how small pebbles are so much better than the rocks. Every rock we can let go of brings with it a freedom and hopefully new beginnings.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 

 

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