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Listing February - 2017
 
  Tuesday
Feb-28
Thought For The Week

"The word 'lent' has different meanings in English. He leant against the wall. She lent me some money. If you're from Cork 'he ran the lent of de field!' The Lent we're talking about means 'springtime', so the emphasis is on growth, on renewal and on new life. Lent is a stretching time, a challenging time, a seasonal reminder of the intrinsically challenging nature of the Christian life.' ~Joseph Cassidy"

We will celebrate Ash Wednesday tomorrow and the beginning of our journey through Lent. Many people will make an effort to visit some church and get blessed with ashes. One church in Co. Galway is taking a novel approach to Ash Wednesday this year with a drive-thru service available at Glenamady church. The approach has been put together for people who are busy and on the go. The design of the church grounds will allow people to drive in one gate, stop and receive their ashes and then drive out a second gate. Some might say this is all a bit tacky but the parish deserve full marks for being creative, for trying something new and at least getting people talking about Ash Wednesday.

So whether it is in a drive-thru, a church or wherever, the most obvious question is why do we put dirty ashes on our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? It is not a good luck charm but an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world. The ashes are a reminder that we are willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Ash Wednesday is not about doom, gloom or negativity. It's a day to celebrate the gift of now and the gift of today. Life may be busy and hectic, but Lent reminds us that we can step back from all the busyness and reflect on our own lives. Like any camera in constant use, we can quite simply be out of focus. Lent will allow us to re focus and to live life in a much more meaningful way.

Lent has been around for many years. It is not an outdated, old fashioned and out of touch event but one that is more relevant and important than it ever was. I hope your Lenten journey for 2017 will be a good one for you.
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-27
Thought For The Week

"The word 'lent' has different meanings in English. He leant against the wall. She lent me some money. If you're from Cork 'he ran the lent of de field!' The Lent we're talking about means 'springtime', so the emphasis is on growth, on renewal and on new life. Lent is a stretching time, a challenging time, a seasonal reminder of the intrinsically challenging nature of the Christian life.' ~Joseph Cassidy"

We will celebrate Ash Wednesday this coming week and the beginning of our journey through Lent. Many people will make an effort to visit some church and get blessed with ashes. One church in Co. Galway is taking a novel approach to Ash Wednesday this year with a drive-thru service available at Glenamady church. The approach has been put together for people who are busy and on the go. The design of the church grounds will allow people to drive in one gate, stop and receive their ashes and then drive out a second gate. Some might say this is all a bit tacky but the parish deserve full marks for being creative, for trying something new and at least getting people talking about Ash Wednesday.

So whether it is in a drive-thru, a church or wherever, the most obvious question is why do we put dirty ashes on our foreheads on Ash Wednesday? It is not a good luck charm but an outward sign that we're mortal, fragile and merely pilgrims passing through this world. The ashes are a reminder that we are willing to do something positive in our spiritual lives. Ash Wednesday is not about doom, gloom or negativity. It's a day to celebrate the gift of now and the gift of today. Life may be busy and hectic, but Lent reminds us that we can step back from all the busyness and reflect on our own lives. Like any camera in constant use, we can quite simply be out of focus. Lent will allow us to re focus and to live life in a much more meaningful way.

Lent has been around for many years. It is not an outdated, old fashioned and out of touch event but one that is more relevant and important than it ever was. I hope your Lenten journey for 2017 will be a good one for you.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-26
Thought For Today is by Fr. John Cullen from Intercom Magazine

All of us, ordinary and flawed, have at heart a seemingly boundless longing for fulfilment. On this Day of Prayer for Temperance, we consider Matt Talbot, who had only seven people at his funeral in 1925, but whom hundreds of thousands came to see as a beacon of hope that reflects the struggles addiction can impose on someone's life. He relied on a higher power that affirmed and accepted him, without preconditions. He made an extraordinary journey from the darkness of excessive addiction to wholeness and the light of holiness. Amidst the anxieties and personal anguishes of his own pain-filled days and nights, he shows us the answer to one of the seven questions that Jesus asks in the Gospel today: 'Can any of you, for all his worrying, add one single cubit to his span of life?'

Matt Talbot could identify with the words of today's Psalm: 'In God is my safety and glory, trust him at all times, pour out your hearts before him'. He imbibed the refreshing waters of grace and renewed his life as a heroic witness of the power and presence of God at work within him.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-25
Thought For The Week

'The most important thing in life is to have stability and an anchor. If you have nothing in life to hold you in place, you're like a ship at the mercy of the tides. You could end up drifting anywhere.' ~John Harris

One has to marvel at life today. There are endless opportunities available to everyone. Technology has made incredible advances in recent years. Everything is nearly at the touch of a button and in an instant. Life expectancy is much longer, medicine has evolved at a rapid pace and we are looking after ourselves much better. Education opportunities have opened up a whole new world and we have access to so much.

But if you take a few steps back from the hectic pace of life, it seems that the world we live in today is without an anchor. For many people their lives also seem to be without an anchor. While we may seemingly have everything, there is still something missing. Some find they are drifting through life, sometimes aimlessly and find that life is passing them by with nothing to show for it. This prompts a few important questions for each of us. Who or what is our anchor in life? Who brings stability and meaning to your life? If life is hectic for you, what is your anchor to help slow you down and allows you to make quality time for yourself?

Only we can honestly answer these for ourselves. If we don't have an anchor we are at clearly at a loss and as a result are always catching up. Thankfully the door is never locked. We can begin to find a meaningful anchor in our lives any time but the search is best started today. It is also an opportune time to appreciate the existing anchors in our lives, be it a family member, a soul mate or a really close friend. It is also an opportune time to be grateful for other anchors, particularly interests like gardening, going for a walk, art, dancing, playing cards, cycling, sport, mindfulness, prayer time, meeting up with friends, music, drama and so much more.

Another hugely significant anchor is a spiritual one and that of course is God. This can mean lots of different things to people, but any connection with God is most definitely an important anchor. When life gets difficult or there is an unexpected crisis we need stability. This is where faith comes in and it can be such a crucial anchor. In the film 'The Bucket List', a key line from one of the main characters Edward goes as follows: "I envy people who have faith. I just can't get my head around it." We can turn to our loving God, our anchor, at any time. It doesn't have to be when a storm is blowing, but is best done each day, quietly and without fuss. This ensures that when a storm does blow, we are ready.

Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 27th
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-24
Thought For The Week

'The most important thing in life is to have stability and an anchor. If you have nothing in life to hold you in place, you're like a ship at the mercy of the tides. You could end up drifting anywhere.' ~John Harris

One has to marvel at life today. There are endless opportunities available to everyone. Technology has made incredible advances in recent years. Everything is nearly at the touch of a button and in an instant. Life expectancy is much longer, medicine has evolved at a rapid pace and we are looking after ourselves much better. Education opportunities have opened up a whole new world and we have access to so much.

But if you take a few steps back from the hectic pace of life, it seems that the world we live in today is without an anchor. For many people their lives also seem to be without an anchor. While we may seemingly have everything, there is still something missing. Some find they are drifting through life, sometimes aimlessly and find that life is passing them by with nothing to show for it. This prompts a few important questions for each of us. Who or what is our anchor in life? Who brings stability and meaning to your life? If life is hectic for you, what is your anchor to help slow you down and allows you to make quality time for yourself?

Only we can honestly answer these for ourselves. If we don't have an anchor we are at clearly at a loss and as a result are always catching up. Thankfully the door is never locked. We can begin to find a meaningful anchor in our lives any time but the search is best started today. It is also an opportune time to appreciate the existing anchors in our lives, be it a family member, a soul mate or a really close friend. It is also an opportune time to be grateful for other anchors, particularly interests like gardening, going for a walk, art, dancing, playing cards, cycling, sport, mindfulness, prayer time, meeting up with friends, music, drama and so much more.

Another hugely significant anchor is a spiritual one and that of course is God. This can mean lots of different things to people, but any connection with God is most definitely an important anchor. When life gets difficult or there is an unexpected crisis we need stability. This is where faith comes in and it can be such a crucial anchor. In the film 'The Bucket List', a key line from one of the main characters Edward goes as follows: "I envy people who have faith. I just can't get my head around it." We can turn to our loving God, our anchor, at any time. It doesn't have to be when a storm is blowing, but is best done each day, quietly and without fuss. This ensures that when a storm does blow, we are ready.

Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 27th
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-23
Thought For The Week

'The most important thing in life is to have stability and an anchor. If you have nothing in life to hold you in place, you're like a ship at the mercy of the tides. You could end up drifting anywhere.' ~John Harris

One has to marvel at life today. There are endless opportunities available to everyone. Technology has made incredible advances in recent years. Everything is nearly at the touch of a button and in an instant. Life expectancy is much longer, medicine has evolved at a rapid pace and we are looking after ourselves much better. Education opportunities have opened up a whole new world and we have access to so much.

But if you take a few steps back from the hectic pace of life, it seems that the world we live in today is without an anchor. For many people their lives also seem to be without an anchor. While we may seemingly have everything, there is still something missing. Some find they are drifting through life, sometimes aimlessly and find that life is passing them by with nothing to show for it. This prompts a few important questions for each of us. Who or what is our anchor in life? Who brings stability and meaning to your life? If life is hectic for you, what is your anchor to help slow you down and allows you to make quality time for yourself?

Only we can honestly answer these for ourselves. If we don't have an anchor we are at clearly at a loss and as a result are always catching up. Thankfully the door is never locked. We can begin to find a meaningful anchor in our lives any time but the search is best started today. It is also an opportune time to appreciate the existing anchors in our lives, be it a family member, a soul mate or a really close friend. It is also an opportune time to be grateful for other anchors, particularly interests like gardening, going for a walk, art, dancing, playing cards, cycling, sport, mindfulness, prayer time, meeting up with friends, music, drama and so much more.

Another hugely significant anchor is a spiritual one and that of course is God. This can mean lots of different things to people, but any connection with God is most definitely an important anchor. When life gets difficult or there is an unexpected crisis we need stability. This is where faith comes in and it can be such a crucial anchor. In the film 'The Bucket List', a key line from one of the main characters Edward goes as follows: "I envy people who have faith. I just can't get my head around it." We can turn to our loving God, our anchor, at any time. It doesn't have to be when a storm is blowing, but is best done each day, quietly and without fuss. This ensures that when a storm does blow, we are ready.

Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 27th
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-22
Thought For The Week

'The most important thing in life is to have stability and an anchor. If you have nothing in life to hold you in place, you're like a ship at the mercy of the tides. You could end up drifting anywhere.' ~John Harris

One has to marvel at life today. There are endless opportunities available to everyone. Technology has made incredible advances in recent years. Everything is nearly at the touch of a button and in an instant. Life expectancy is much longer, medicine has evolved at a rapid pace and we are looking after ourselves much better. Education opportunities have opened up a whole new world and we have access to so much.

But if you take a few steps back from the hectic pace of life, it seems that the world we live in today is without an anchor. For many people their lives also seem to be without an anchor. While we may seemingly have everything, there is still something missing. Some find they are drifting through life, sometimes aimlessly and find that life is passing them by with nothing to show for it. This prompts a few important questions for each of us. Who or what is our anchor in life? Who brings stability and meaning to your life? If life is hectic for you, what is your anchor to help slow you down and allows you to make quality time for yourself?

Only we can honestly answer these for ourselves. If we don't have an anchor we are at clearly at a loss and as a result are always catching up. Thankfully the door is never locked. We can begin to find a meaningful anchor in our lives any time but the search is best started today. It is also an opportune time to appreciate the existing anchors in our lives, be it a family member, a soul mate or a really close friend. It is also an opportune time to be grateful for other anchors, particularly interests like gardening, going for a walk, art, dancing, playing cards, cycling, sport, mindfulness, prayer time, meeting up with friends, music, drama and so much more.

Another hugely significant anchor is a spiritual one and that of course is God. This can mean lots of different things to people, but any connection with God is most definitely an important anchor. When life gets difficult or there is an unexpected crisis we need stability. This is where faith comes in and it can be such a crucial anchor. In the film 'The Bucket List', a key line from one of the main characters Edward goes as follows: "I envy people who have faith. I just can't get my head around it." We can turn to our loving God, our anchor, at any time. It doesn't have to be when a storm is blowing, but is best done each day, quietly and without fuss. This ensures that when a storm does blow, we are ready.

Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 27th
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-21
Thought For The Week

'The most important thing in life is to have stability and an anchor. If you have nothing in life to hold you in place, you're like a ship at the mercy of the tides. You could end up drifting anywhere.' ~John Harris

One has to marvel at life today. There are endless opportunities available to everyone. Technology has made incredible advances in recent years. Everything is nearly at the touch of a button and in an instant. Life expectancy is much longer, medicine has evolved at a rapid pace and we are looking after ourselves much better. Education opportunities have opened up a whole new world and we have access to so much.

But if you take a few steps back from the hectic pace of life, it seems that the world we live in today is without an anchor. For many people their lives also seem to be without an anchor. While we may seemingly have everything, there is still something missing. Some find they are drifting through life, sometimes aimlessly and find that life is passing them by with nothing to show for it. This prompts a few important questions for each of us. Who or what is our anchor in life? Who brings stability and meaning to your life? If life is hectic for you, what is your anchor to help slow you down and allows you to make quality time for yourself?

Only we can honestly answer these for ourselves. If we don't have an anchor we are at clearly at a loss and as a result are always catching up. Thankfully the door is never locked. We can begin to find a meaningful anchor in our lives any time but the search is best started today. It is also an opportune time to appreciate the existing anchors in our lives, be it a family member, a soul mate or a really close friend. It is also an opportune time to be grateful for other anchors, particularly interests like gardening, going for a walk, art, dancing, playing cards, cycling, sport, mindfulness, prayer time, meeting up with friends, music, drama and so much more.

Another hugely significant anchor is a spiritual one and that of course is God. This can mean lots of different things to people, but any connection with God is most definitely an important anchor. When life gets difficult or there is an unexpected crisis we need stability. This is where faith comes in and it can be such a crucial anchor. In the film 'The Bucket List', a key line from one of the main characters Edward goes as follows: "I envy people who have faith. I just can't get my head around it." We can turn to our loving God, our anchor, at any time. It doesn't have to be when a storm is blowing, but is best done each day, quietly and without fuss. This ensures that when a storm does blow, we are ready.

Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 27th
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-20
Thought For The Week

'The most important thing in life is to have stability and an anchor. If you have nothing in life to hold you in place, you're like a ship at the mercy of the tides. You could end up drifting anywhere.' ~John Harris

One has to marvel at life today. There are endless opportunities available to everyone. Technology has made incredible advances in recent years. Everything is nearly at the touch of a button and in an instant. Life expectancy is much longer, medicine has evolved at a rapid pace and we are looking after ourselves much better. Education opportunities have opened up a whole new world and we have access to so much.

But if you take a few steps back from the hectic pace of life, it seems that the world we live in today is without an anchor. For many people their lives also seem to be without an anchor. While we may seemingly have everything, there is still something missing. Some find they are drifting through life, sometimes aimlessly and find that life is passing them by with nothing to show for it. This prompts a few important questions for each of us. Who or what is our anchor in life? Who brings stability and meaning to your life? If life is hectic for you, what is your anchor to help slow you down and allows you to make quality time for yourself?

Only we can honestly answer these for ourselves. If we don't have an anchor we are at clearly at a loss and as a result are always catching up. Thankfully the door is never locked. We can begin to find a meaningful anchor in our lives any time but the search is best started today. It is also an opportune time to appreciate the existing anchors in our lives, be it a family member, a soul mate or a really close friend. It is also an opportune time to be grateful for other anchors, particularly interests like gardening, going for a walk, art, dancing, playing cards, cycling, sport, mindfulness, prayer time, meeting up with friends, music, drama and so much more.

Another hugely significant anchor is a spiritual one and that of course is God. This can mean lots of different things to people, but any connection with God is most definitely an important anchor. When life gets difficult or there is an unexpected crisis we need stability. This is where faith comes in and it can be such a crucial anchor. In the film 'The Bucket List', a key line from one of the main characters Edward goes as follows: "I envy people who have faith. I just can't get my head around it." We can turn to our loving God, our anchor, at any time. It doesn't have to be when a storm is blowing, but is best done each day, quietly and without fuss. This ensures that when a storm does blow, we are ready.

Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 27th
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-19
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-18
Thought For The Week (marking Valentine's Day)

"There are two basic motivating forces: fear and love. When we are afraid, we pull back from life. When we are in love, we open to all that life has to offer with passion, excitement, and acceptance. We need to learn to love ourselves first, in all our glory and our imperfections. If we cannot love ourselves, we cannot fully open to our ability to love others or our potential to create." ~John Lennon

Some will say that Valentine's Day is a load of hype and completely built up into something way too big. Despite the commercial side of the day, it is good to set aside at least one day to genuinely show someone we love and care. If you take away all the trimmings around today, you are left with that precious gift called love. Valentine's Day is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else. It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love.

Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Love is a sacred energy and every single person needs it to survive. Like many gifts that are given to us each day we tend to take love for granted. But St Valentine's Day at least is one day when we realize just how lucky we are to have love in our lives. It takes a while to build up love but only a second to lose it. You can't buy it or even sell it. It is up to us to treasure this most precious gift.
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-17
Thought For The Week (marking Valentine's Day)

"There are two basic motivating forces: fear and love. When we are afraid, we pull back from life. When we are in love, we open to all that life has to offer with passion, excitement, and acceptance. We need to learn to love ourselves first, in all our glory and our imperfections. If we cannot love ourselves, we cannot fully open to our ability to love others or our potential to create." ~John Lennon

Some will say that Valentine's Day is a load of hype and completely built up into something way too big. Despite the commercial side of the day, it is good to set aside at least one day to genuinely show someone we love and care. If you take away all the trimmings around today, you are left with that precious gift called love. Valentine's Day is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else. It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love.

Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Love is a sacred energy and every single person needs it to survive. Like many gifts that are given to us each day we tend to take love for granted. But St Valentine's Day at least is one day when we realize just how lucky we are to have love in our lives. It takes a while to build up love but only a second to lose it. You can't buy it or even sell it. It is up to us to treasure this most precious gift.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-16
Thought For The Week (marking Valentine's Day)

"There are two basic motivating forces: fear and love. When we are afraid, we pull back from life. When we are in love, we open to all that life has to offer with passion, excitement, and acceptance. We need to learn to love ourselves first, in all our glory and our imperfections. If we cannot love ourselves, we cannot fully open to our ability to love others or our potential to create." ~John Lennon

Some will say that Valentine's Day is a load of hype and completely built up into something way too big. Despite the commercial side of the day, it is good to set aside at least one day to genuinely show someone we love and care. If you take away all the trimmings around today, you are left with that precious gift called love. Valentine's Day is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else. It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love.

Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Love is a sacred energy and every single person needs it to survive. Like many gifts that are given to us each day we tend to take love for granted. But St Valentine's Day at least is one day when we realize just how lucky we are to have love in our lives. It takes a while to build up love but only a second to lose it. You can't buy it or even sell it. It is up to us to treasure this most precious gift.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-15
"There are two basic motivating forces: fear and love. When we are afraid, we pull back from life. When we are in love, we open to all that life has to offer with passion, excitement, and acceptance. We need to learn to love ourselves first, in all our glory and our imperfections. If we cannot love ourselves, we cannot fully open to our ability to love others or our potential to create." ~John Lennon

Some will say that Valentine's Day is a load of hype and completely built up into something way too big. Despite the commercial side of the day, it is good to set aside at least one day to genuinely show someone we love and care. If you take away all the trimmings around today, you are left with that precious gift called love. Valentine's Day is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else. It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love.

Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Love is a sacred energy and every single person needs it to survive. Like many gifts that are given to us each day we tend to take love for granted. But St Valentine's Day at least is one day when we realize just how lucky we are to have love in our lives. It takes a while to build up love but only a second to lose it. You can't buy it or even sell it. It is up to us to treasure this most precious gift.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-14
"There are two basic motivating forces: fear and love. When we are afraid, we pull back from life. When we are in love, we open to all that life has to offer with passion, excitement, and acceptance. We need to learn to love ourselves first, in all our glory and our imperfections. If we cannot love ourselves, we cannot fully open to our ability to love others or our potential to create." ~John Lennon

Some will say that today Valentine's Day is a load of hype and completely built up into something way too big. Despite the commercial side of the day, it is good to set aside at least one day to genuinely show someone we love and care. If you take away all the trimmings around today, you are left with that precious gift called love. Valentine's Day is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else. It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love.

Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Love is a sacred energy and every single person needs it to survive. Like many gifts that are given to us each day we tend to take love for granted. But today at least is one day when we realize just how lucky we are to have love in our lives. It takes a while to build up love but only a second to lose it. You can't buy it or even sell it. It is up to us to treasure this most precious gift.
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-13
"There are two basic motivating forces: fear and love. When we are afraid, we pull back from life. When we are in love, we open to all that life has to offer with passion, excitement, and acceptance. We need to learn to love ourselves first, in all our glory and our imperfections. If we cannot love ourselves, we cannot fully open to our ability to love others or our potential to create." ~John Lennon

Some will say that tomorrow Valentine's Day is a load of hype and completely built up into something way too big. Despite the commercial side of the day, it is good to set aside at least one day to genuinely show someone we love and care. If you take away all the trimmings around tomorrow, you are left with that precious gift called love. Valentine's Day is not just limited to romantic love. It's a day that celebrates every moment of love. If we say God is love then every moment of love brings with it an energy and uniqueness that can't be found anywhere else. It is we ourselves who do our best to limit the effects of love.

Life knocks us and hurts us from time to time and we retreat into our hiding places. But love invites us back out of our darkness and uncertainties. Love is a sacred energy and every single person needs it to survive. Like many gifts that are given to us each day we tend to take love for granted. But tomorrow at least is one day when we realize just how lucky we are to have love in our lives. It takes a while to build up love but only a second to lose it. You can't buy it or even sell it. It is up to us to treasure this most precious gift.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-12
Thought For Today by Jane Mellet from Intercom Magazine

This Sunday we have a third extract from the Sermon on the Mount. It can appear at first glance to be a series of moral statements and rules from Jesus. On closer reflection we can see Jesus' message here is the call for each of us to 'go deeper'. The Scribes and the Pharisees followed the letter of the law but without depth. Jesus is clear that he has not come to demolish the law, rather, this whole passage is a call to a more profound reflection on our lives; not ticking boxes but moving towards a deeper change of heart in dealings with others.

Jesus gives many examples of how people might do this: warning against the hypocrisy of offering gifts and rituals at the altar when we may have huge anger and resentment towards another. Is the real sacrament not in reconciling that relationship first? Which offering is more life-giving? It is not enough to 'not murder', but we must watch our anger which can lead to violence. Jesus is calling on people to watch their thoughts which can lead to serious actions like murder and adultery. When we encounter Christ, the grace that this experience brings can make us aware of what is not ok in our lives. We are called to a radical conversion, a change of heart. And so we read today's passage with our hearts, not our heads. It may help to recall a time when you felt God's grace bringing you to a deeper realisation about your life.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-11
Thought For The Week

Jesus said to the disciples: "You are the salt of the earth. But if salt becomes tasteless, what can make it salty again? It is good for nothing and can only be thrown out to be trampled underfoot by people." ~Matthew 5:13

Salt is a remarkable thing and is all around us. Salt is a natural mineral made up of white cube-shaped crystals composed of two elements, sodium and chlorine. It is colourless, odourless and has a distinctive and characteristic taste. It can be found underground and on the earth's surface in the dried up residues of ancient seas. But our biggest source of salt is in our seas and oceans. With an average of 26 million tonnes per cubic kilometre, sea water offers a seemingly inexhaustible supply which if extracted, would cover the world's total land mass to a depth of 35 metres. It is well known that small amounts of salt are essential for our health. Adults need less than 1 gram per day and children need even less. But as a nation we eat approximately 8.1g of salt per day, far more than we need.

If we roll the clock back to the time of Jesus, we know that salt was at the centre of daily life. Galilee had a big fishing industry and we know that lots of fish were exported to many parts of the Roman Empire. To keep them fresh they were covered in salt and with lots of salt of available this was an easy thing to do. So when Jesus used the image of salt, it would have been a relevant image to the people who were listening to Jesus.

Jesus calls us to be 'salt of the earth'. What salt does for food, we are called to do for the world, to give life 'taste'. We do this by doing our best, finding the right balance in what needs to be done and when to step back and rest. If too much salt is sprinkled it can be harmful and deadly. Likewise with life, if there are extremes of anything then it becomes counter productive. Our faith is an essential part of life. It adds something unique and essential to our everyday lives. Too little faith and we will be short and too much faith could be simply too much. Jesus encourages us to be 'salt of the earth'. We bring flavour to life through all the good things we do each day. If life becomes tasteless, it can be a difficult challenge to bring its taste back again. Getting the balance in what we bring to each day is so important and is something we can never take for granted.


(Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 13th)
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-10
Thought For The Week

Jesus said to the disciples: "You are the salt of the earth. But if salt becomes tasteless, what can make it salty again? It is good for nothing and can only be thrown out to be trampled underfoot by people." ~Matthew 5:13

Salt is a remarkable thing and is all around us. Salt is a natural mineral made up of white cube-shaped crystals composed of two elements, sodium and chlorine. It is colourless, odourless and has a distinctive and characteristic taste. It can be found underground and on the earth's surface in the dried up residues of ancient seas. But our biggest source of salt is in our seas and oceans. With an average of 26 million tonnes per cubic kilometre, sea water offers a seemingly inexhaustible supply which if extracted, would cover the world's total land mass to a depth of 35 metres. It is well known that small amounts of salt are essential for our health. Adults need less than 1 gram per day and children need even less. But as a nation we eat approximately 8.1g of salt per day, far more than we need.

If we roll the clock back to the time of Jesus, we know that salt was at the centre of daily life. Galilee had a big fishing industry and we know that lots of fish were exported to many parts of the Roman Empire. To keep them fresh they were covered in salt and with lots of salt of available this was an easy thing to do. So when Jesus used the image of salt, it would have been a relevant image to the people who were listening to Jesus.

Jesus calls us to be 'salt of the earth'. What salt does for food, we are called to do for the world, to give life 'taste'. We do this by doing our best, finding the right balance in what needs to be done and when to step back and rest. If too much salt is sprinkled it can be harmful and deadly. Likewise with life, if there are extremes of anything then it becomes counter productive. Our faith is an essential part of life. It adds something unique and essential to our everyday lives. Too little faith and we will be short and too much faith could be simply too much. Jesus encourages us to be 'salt of the earth'. We bring flavour to life through all the good things we do each day. If life becomes tasteless, it can be a difficult challenge to bring its taste back again. Getting the balance in what we bring to each day is so important and is something we can never take for granted.


(Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 13th)
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-09
Thought For The Week

Jesus said to the disciples: "You are the salt of the earth. But if salt becomes tasteless, what can make it salty again? It is good for nothing and can only be thrown out to be trampled underfoot by people." ~Matthew 5:13

Salt is a remarkable thing and is all around us. Salt is a natural mineral made up of white cube-shaped crystals composed of two elements, sodium and chlorine. It is colourless, odourless and has a distinctive and characteristic taste. It can be found underground and on the earth's surface in the dried up residues of ancient seas. But our biggest source of salt is in our seas and oceans. With an average of 26 million tonnes per cubic kilometre, sea water offers a seemingly inexhaustible supply which if extracted, would cover the world's total land mass to a depth of 35 metres. It is well known that small amounts of salt are essential for our health. Adults need less than 1 gram per day and children need even less. But as a nation we eat approximately 8.1g of salt per day, far more than we need.

If we roll the clock back to the time of Jesus, we know that salt was at the centre of daily life. Galilee had a big fishing industry and we know that lots of fish were exported to many parts of the Roman Empire. To keep them fresh they were covered in salt and with lots of salt of available this was an easy thing to do. So when Jesus used the image of salt, it would have been a relevant image to the people who were listening to Jesus.

Jesus calls us to be 'salt of the earth'. What salt does for food, we are called to do for the world, to give life 'taste'. We do this by doing our best, finding the right balance in what needs to be done and when to step back and rest. If too much salt is sprinkled it can be harmful and deadly. Likewise with life, if there are extremes of anything then it becomes counter productive. Our faith is an essential part of life. It adds something unique and essential to our everyday lives. Too little faith and we will be short and too much faith could be simply too much. Jesus encourages us to be 'salt of the earth'. We bring flavour to life through all the good things we do each day. If life becomes tasteless, it can be a difficult challenge to bring its taste back again. Getting the balance in what we bring to each day is so important and is something we can never take for granted.


(Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 13th)
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-08
Thought For The Week

Jesus said to the disciples: "You are the salt of the earth. But if salt becomes tasteless, what can make it salty again? It is good for nothing and can only be thrown out to be trampled underfoot by people." ~Matthew 5:13

Salt is a remarkable thing and is all around us. Salt is a natural mineral made up of white cube-shaped crystals composed of two elements, sodium and chlorine. It is colourless, odourless and has a distinctive and characteristic taste. It can be found underground and on the earth's surface in the dried up residues of ancient seas. But our biggest source of salt is in our seas and oceans. With an average of 26 million tonnes per cubic kilometre, sea water offers a seemingly inexhaustible supply which if extracted, would cover the world's total land mass to a depth of 35 metres. It is well known that small amounts of salt are essential for our health. Adults need less than 1 gram per day and children need even less. But as a nation we eat approximately 8.1g of salt per day, far more than we need.

If we roll the clock back to the time of Jesus, we know that salt was at the centre of daily life. Galilee had a big fishing industry and we know that lots of fish were exported to many parts of the Roman Empire. To keep them fresh they were covered in salt and with lots of salt of available this was an easy thing to do. So when Jesus used the image of salt, it would have been a relevant image to the people who were listening to Jesus.

Jesus calls us to be 'salt of the earth'. What salt does for food, we are called to do for the world, to give life 'taste'. We do this by doing our best, finding the right balance in what needs to be done and when to step back and rest. If too much salt is sprinkled it can be harmful and deadly. Likewise with life, if there are extremes of anything then it becomes counter productive. Our faith is an essential part of life. It adds something unique and essential to our everyday lives. Too little faith and we will be short and too much faith could be simply too much. Jesus encourages us to be 'salt of the earth'. We bring flavour to life through all the good things we do each day. If life becomes tasteless, it can be a difficult challenge to bring its taste back again. Getting the balance in what we bring to each day is so important and is something we can never take for granted.


(Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 13th)
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Feb-07
Thought For The Week

Jesus said to the disciples: "You are the salt of the earth. But if salt becomes tasteless, what can make it salty again? It is good for nothing and can only be thrown out to be trampled underfoot by people." ~Matthew 5:13

Salt is a remarkable thing and is all around us. Salt is a natural mineral made up of white cube-shaped crystals composed of two elements, sodium and chlorine. It is colourless, odourless and has a distinctive and characteristic taste. It can be found underground and on the earth's surface in the dried up residues of ancient seas. But our biggest source of salt is in our seas and oceans. With an average of 26 million tonnes per cubic kilometre, sea water offers a seemingly inexhaustible supply which if extracted, would cover the world's total land mass to a depth of 35 metres. It is well known that small amounts of salt are essential for our health. Adults need less than 1 gram per day and children need even less. But as a nation we eat approximately 8.1g of salt per day, far more than we need.

If we roll the clock back to the time of Jesus, we know that salt was at the centre of daily life. Galilee had a big fishing industry and we know that lots of fish were exported to many parts of the Roman Empire. To keep them fresh they were covered in salt and with lots of salt of available this was an easy thing to do. So when Jesus used the image of salt, it would have been a relevant image to the people who were listening to Jesus.

Jesus calls us to be 'salt of the earth'. What salt does for food, we are called to do for the world, to give life 'taste'. We do this by doing our best, finding the right balance in what needs to be done and when to step back and rest. If too much salt is sprinkled it can be harmful and deadly. Likewise with life, if there are extremes of anything then it becomes counter productive. Our faith is an essential part of life. It adds something unique and essential to our everyday lives. Too little faith and we will be short and too much faith could be simply too much. Jesus encourages us to be 'salt of the earth'. We bring flavour to life through all the good things we do each day. If life becomes tasteless, it can be a difficult challenge to bring its taste back again. Getting the balance in what we bring to each day is so important and is something we can never take for granted.


(Next update of Thought For The Week will be Monday Feb 13th)
 
 
 
  Monday
Feb-06
Jesus said to the disciples: "You are the salt of the earth. But if salt becomes tasteless, what can make it salty again? It is good for nothing and can only be thrown out to be trampled underfoot by people." ~Matthew 5:13

Salt is a remarkable thing and is all around us. Salt is a natural mineral made up of white cube-shaped crystals composed of two elements, sodium and chlorine. It is colourless, odourless and has a distinctive and characteristic taste. It can be found underground and on the earth's surface in the dried up residues of ancient seas. But our biggest source of salt is in our seas and oceans. With an average of 26 million tonnes per cubic kilometre, sea water offers a seemingly inexhaustible supply which if extracted, would cover the world's total land mass to a depth of 35 metres. It is well known that small amounts of salt are essential for our health. Adults need less than 1 gram per day and children need even less. But as a nation we eat approximately 8.1g of salt per day, far more than we need.

If we roll the clock back to the time of Jesus, we know that salt was at the centre of daily life. Galilee had a big fishing industry and we know that lots of fish were exported to many parts of the Roman Empire. To keep them fresh they were covered in salt and with lots of salt of available this was an easy thing to do. So when Jesus used the image of salt, it would have been a relevant image to the people who were listening to Jesus.

Jesus calls us to be 'salt of the earth'. What salt does for food, we are called to do for the world, to give life 'taste'. We do this by doing our best, finding the right balance in what needs to be done and when to step back and rest. If too much salt is sprinkled it can be harmful and deadly. Likewise with life, if there are extremes of anything then it becomes counter productive. Our faith is an essential part of life. It adds something unique and essential to our everyday lives. Too little faith and we will be short and too much faith could be simply too much. Jesus encourages us to be 'salt of the earth'. We bring flavour to life through all the good things we do each day. If life becomes tasteless, it can be a difficult challenge to bring its taste back again. Getting the balance in what we bring to each day is so important and is something we can never take for granted.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Feb-05
Our Thought For Today is by Jane Mellett called 'Salt and Light' from Intercom magazine

In today's Gospel we hear of two scenarios where salt is concerned: one is that we are called to be 'salt of the earth'. What salt does for food, Christians are called to do for the world - to give life 'taste'. You might recall someone who brought 'taste' to your own life, encouraging you on your journey, offering hope, a new insight or project, someone you followed and learned from. What gifts did they bring?

The other scenario in the Gospel today is where salt has lost its taste - how can it be restored? You might recall someone you placed great hope in, whether it be a family member, a public figure, a Church leader or politician; someone who had vision and inspired others. Yet the 'salt' or the 'taste' was lost. We see this all around us in our world, when someone's potential is lost.

There are many situations in our world today where people's light is not allowed to shine. It is controlled, hidden, prevented from being used for the benefit of all because of jealousy or perhaps others are afraid of the consequences. Jesus tells us that these lights must shine, for all, and then we can give glory to God in heaven for the fruits it may produce. To help lights shine and to give flavour to the world is our task today. Another way of putting it might be: how are the effects of our encounter with Jesus Christ evident in our lives?
 
 
 
  Saturday
Feb-04
'Through the intercession of Saint Blaise, bishop and martyr, may God protect you from all ailments of the throat and from all forms of evil. Amen.' ~Blessing given on the feast of St.Blaise (3rd Feb)

Yesterday was the feast of St.Blaise whose life was very simple and ordinary. He is known worldwide for his care of those who were sick and particularly those with ailments of the throat. Many people get their throats blessed today. Some may think it's a load of silly piety and yet for many it's a blessing that brings comfort and reassurance. Saint Blaise's protection of those with throat troubles apparently comes from a legend that a boy was brought to him who had a fishbone stuck in his throat. The boy was about to die when Saint Blaise healed him.

He was a physician who was very close to God. The sick came in crowds to consult him and some even brought animals as well. St.Blaise cured many people of their ailments and always sent them away with his blessing. He cured not just physical ailments of the throat but spiritual ones as well. We pray to St.Blaise to heal us from all ailments of the throat, we ask for his protection and we ask his special blessings on each of us today.
 
 
 
  Friday
Feb-03
'Through the intercession of Saint Blaise, bishop and martyr, may God protect you from all ailments of the throat and from all forms of evil. Amen.' ~Blessing given on the feast of St.Blaise (3rd Feb)

Today is the feast of St.Blaise whose life was very simple and ordinary. He is known worldwide for his care of those who were sick and particularly those with ailments of the throat. Many people get their throats blessed today. Some may think it's a load of silly piety and yet for many it's a blessing that brings comfort and reassurance. Saint Blaise's protection of those with throat troubles apparently comes from a legend that a boy was brought to him who had a fishbone stuck in his throat. The boy was about to die when Saint Blaise healed him.

He was a physician who was very close to God. The sick came in crowds to consult him and some even brought animals as well. St.Blaise cured many people of their ailments and always sent them away with his blessing. He cured not just physical ailments of the throat but spiritual ones as well. We pray to St.Blaise to heal us from all ailments of the throat, we ask for his protection and we ask his special blessings on each of us today.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Feb-02
'It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light.' ~ Aristotle Onassis

Today (Feb 2nd) is Candlemas Day. Like many Christian celebrations its roots lie deep in pagan times. The date lies half way between the winter solstice and the spring equinox. It is a time of transition from winter into spring. Apparently in Ireland daylight increases by 2 minutes each day. This might not seem much but put a few days together and you can really see the difference.

On the Christian calendar it was renamed 'Candlemas' to mark the presentation of Jesus in the temple. It is a day that is rich in meaning and symbolism. We live in a world that is often darkened by evil and darker forces. We believe that the light of Christ is powerful and strong enough to wipe out all forms of darkness. This light knows no limits or boundaries. It's a light that is never forced but when we choose to be open to this light, great things begin to happen. Today we invite this light into our lives, into our darker corners and wherever such light is most needed at the moment.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Feb-01
'Spirituality is recognizing and celebrating that we are all inextricably connected to each other by a power greater than all of us, and that our connection to that power and to one another is grounded in love and compassion. Practicing spirituality brings a sense of perspective, meaning and purpose to our lives.' ~Brené Brown

Today we move into February. Already we notice a stretch in daylight and there is a hint of spring in the air. But we do not get carried away just yet. The feast of St Brigid is always celebrated on Feb 1st. Traditionally it marks the arrival of spring. The feast of St Brigid is a day to reflect on all our present blessings and all the good around us. She had time for everyone including the poor but above all she inspired people to be themselves. She encouraged them to be proud of who they were, to be proud of their roots, to be proud of their gifts and talents and to be proud of their faith.

Using rushes she wove them all into a cross, to remind us that all the different strands of our lives are connected. They are connected not by chance but by the gentle presence of God in our lives. Brigid gathers our rushes of sorrow and blessings, of happiness and pain, tears and laughter, kindness and caring, of voluntary groups and organisations, of families, relations and friends, of schools and hospitals, of work, sport and recreation and all the little things we do with faith, hope and love. Brigid weaves them all with loving hands into something richer and more beautiful. For her God is always at the centre of everything we do, not just the good parts but simply everything. We ask her many blessings as we begin a new month today.
 
 

 

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