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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing April - 2019
 
  Tuesday
Apr-30
 
 
 
  Friday
Apr-26
"The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that little extra" ~Jimmy Johnson

Much of our lives are built on what"s ordinary and routine. We try and do our best with what we have each day. We"re also aware of some people who go to extraordinary levels to get certain things done. Many of us admire their enthusiasm and energy. We go there sometimes ourselves but doing everything extraordinary well can never be sustained over long periods of time. Much more manageable and well within our reach is to the ordinary things as best we can. Then on occasions to allow ourselves do the little extra something that will always make a difference. We are now on the final lap of our journey through Lent. Why not allow ourselves do that something little extra today or during this coming week? It could and will make the world of a difference.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Apr-21
'Although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of people overcoming it.' ~Helen Keller

There are people in our world and all around us who overcome suffering every day. We all know people who keep smiling and joking through serious illness or misfortune and people who have many problems of their own but are still always available to help others. There are brave folks who, having lost a loved one to illness, go on to dedicate their time to charitable works and fundraising in the hope that others might avoid the same agony. And then there are people who, though themselves in the depths of pain or despair, can help others simply by empathising with their suffering. In different ways, these are all 'Easter people', full of hope and light amidst the darkness. They remind us that even in the darkest of situations, God's light can shine.

Today we celebrate the ultimate victory over suffering and death. We have journeyed this week through the darkness of loneliness, betrayal and abandonment into the light of forgiveness, healing and new life. In her poem Dawn, the poet Emily Dickinson wrote: 'Not knowing when the dawn will come, I open every door.' Dawn will always emerge from darkness. If we want to be 'Easter people', we need to be open to throwing ourselves into the ups and downs, the sufferings and the joys of life, always open to experiencing resurrection and hope in all their forms. Christ is risen - alleluia!
 
 
 
  Friday
Apr-19
Why is today called Good Friday?

It's a simple question but also a challenging one. Why not call it Dark Friday, Bad Friday, Bleak Friday or even Horrible Friday? But why call it good? It is anything but. The story of Jesus on Good Friday may be familiar but nothing can ever take from its awfulness, the pain, the suffering, the betrayal and the desperation. It's a tragic story that has few strands of love and goodness except for the women who stood by Jesus so faithfully when everyone else ran for cover, (with the notable exception of John). Today is called %u2018Good' because we know that Jesus triumphed over evil, darkness and sin. Jesus knows better than anyone our struggles and difficulties in life. Life is fragile and so our journey through it is fragile at the best of times. We are never on our own and we are given the strength to carry whatever cross we may carry in life. We also pray for anyone we know who may be struggling or who may be carrying a particularly heavy cross in their lives. The world unites in prayer today. We pray for each other and especially those who are struggling.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Apr-18
Thought For The Week

"Words matter. Words leave a lasting impression. Are our words positive or negative, do they build up or tear down, do they encourage or destroy? We are formed in some way by what we hear, what we read and what we say, even if we don't really mean it. Words matter." ~Bishop of Meath Tom Deenihan, speaking at the School Awards Ceremony in Col"iste Pobail Bheanntra" (Bantry Community College) last Thursday

In a touching talk for parents and students, Bishop Tom spoke how words really matter. He affirmed and encouraged everyone present last Thursday evening. He had words of encouragement for those who excelled, for those who had reached their goal, for those who struggled and overcame and especially a word of encouragement for those who continue to do their best. He said: "At the end of the day, we are all different, with different gifts, talents, skills and attributes. We are what God made us. We are all different. All we can do is our best. Words matter so much: 'Congratulations', 'Well done', 'Keep it up' and 'Thank You'."

As we start our journey through Holy Week words also matter. It is a sacred week, a solemn week but also a week to celebrate especially on Easter Sunday. The story of Holy Week is a mix of so many negative and positive words. Negative words such as hate, evil, darkness, bitterness, jealousy, anger and suffering come to mind. Jesus was at the receiving end of these. Positive words such as love, peace, healing, new beginnings, understanding, acceptance and forgiveness come to mind. Jesus was at the heart of all of these.

Our negative and positive words are also in the story of Holy Week. The invitation is to leave as many of the negative words at the cross on Good Friday. Easter is about a collection of many beautiful positive words that are just within our reach. Our world desperately needs them and so do we. I hope they become part of your Easter story too. Happy Easter!
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Apr-16
Thought For The Week

"Words matter. Words leave a lasting impression. Are our words positive or negative, do they build up or tear down, do they encourage or destroy? We are formed in some way by what we hear, what we read and what we say, even if we don't really mean it. Words matter." ~Bishop of Meath Tom Deenihan, speaking at the School Awards Ceremony in Colaiste Pobail Bheanntraí (Bantry Community College) last Thursday

In a touching talk for parents and students, Bishop Tom spoke how words really matter. He affirmed and encouraged everyone present last Thursday evening. He had words of encouragement for those who excelled, for those who had reached their goal, for those who struggled and overcame and especially a word of encouragement for those who continue to do their best. He said: "At the end of the day, we are all different, with different gifts, talents, skills and attributes. We are what God made us. We are all different. All we can do is our best. Words matter so much: 'Congratulations', 'Well done', 'Keep it up' and 'Thank You'."

As we start our journey through Holy Week words also matter. It is a sacred week, a solemn week but also a week to celebrate especially on Easter Sunday. The story of Holy Week is a mix of so many negative and positive words. Negative words such as hate, evil, darkness, bitterness, jealousy, anger and suffering come to mind. Jesus was at the receiving end of these. Positive words such as love, peace, healing, new beginnings, understanding, acceptance and forgiveness come to mind. Jesus was at the heart of all of these.

Our negative and positive words are also in the story of Holy Week. The invitation is to leave as many of the negative words at the cross on Good Friday. Easter is about a collection of many beautiful positive words that are just within our reach. Our world desperately needs them and so do we. I hope they become part of your Easter story too. Happy Easter!
 
 
 
  Monday
Apr-15
Thought For The Week

"Words matter. Words leave a lasting impression. Are our words positive or negative, do they build up or tear down, do they encourage or destroy? We are formed in some way by what we hear, what we read and what we say, even if we don't really mean it. Words matter." ~Bishop of Meath Tom Deenihan, speaking at the School Awards Ceremony in Coláiste Pobail Bheanntraí (Bantry Community College) last Thursday

In a touching talk for parents and students, Bishop Tom spoke how words really matter. He affirmed and encouraged everyone present last Thursday evening. He had words of encouragement for those who excelled, for those who had reached their goal, for those who struggled and overcame and especially a word of encouragement for those who continue to do their best. He said: "At the end of the day, we are all different, with different gifts, talents, skills and attributes. We are what God made us. We are all different. All we can do is our best. Words matter so much: 'Congratulations', 'Well done', 'Keep it up' and 'Thank You'."

As we start our journey through Holy Week words also matter. It is a sacred week, a solemn week but also a week to celebrate especially on Easter Sunday. The story of Holy Week is a mix of so many negative and positive words. Negative words such as hate, evil, darkness, bitterness, jealousy, anger and suffering come to mind. Jesus was at the receiving end of these. Positive words such as love, peace, healing, new beginnings, understanding, acceptance and forgiveness come to mind. Jesus was at the heart of all of these.

Our negative and positive words are also in the story of Holy Week. The invitation is to leave as many of the negative words at the cross on Good Friday. Easter is about a collection of many beautiful positive words that are just within our reach. Our world desperately needs them and so do we. I hope they become part of your Easter story too. Happy Easter!
 
 
 
  Sunday
Apr-14
Thought For Today is by Triona Doherty called 'Towards The Cross'

We know where Jesus is going to end up, and Jesus knows it too. At the beginning of today's Mass, we hear of Jesus' spectacular entry into Jerusalem. The crowds who greet him cry out and praise God - the King has come! It is similar to how victorious army generals were welcomed home. These people have set their hopes on Jesus. They are waiting for a Messiah and King, and have heard so much about this preacher - is he the one they've been waiting for?

But Jesus is not the hero they've been expecting. He has not come to raise up an army or become a great political leader. Quite the opposite: Jesus has come to Jerusalem to die. The story takes a dark and dramatic turn, and we are plunged into a tale of arrest, trial, torture and death. Before long, the crowds are shouting 'Crucify him! Crucify him!' and taunting him on the cross to 'save himself if he is the Christ of God'. Jesus' triumphant entrance into the city is also his entry into his betrayal, suffering, and death.

We play our part in the unfolding drama today, as we first hold up our palm branches and later join the crowds condemning Jesus. In his Palm Sunday homily to young people last year, Pope Francis said the changing reactions of the crowds 'expresses the contradictory feelings that we too, the men and women of today, experience: the capacity for great love, but also for great hatred; the capacity for courageous self-sacrifice, but also the ability to 'wash our hands'.'
Today we place ourselves in the Passion of Jesus, and we look to the Cross as our consolation and our challenge.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Apr-13
Thought For The Week

'Gratefulness is much more than an act, it is a mood that saturates my entire being. My deepest desire is to live every moment in this mood of gratefulness, handing back my whole life in thankfulness to the One who has given me that life.' ~Author unknown

Certain people seem to have this natural inclination of gratefulness. You know it from their body language. They seem at ease with the swings of life, at ease with their contribution to life and seem less inclined to stress when things don't go their way. Getting in touch with a sense of gratefulness is at the heart of nearly every religion. When we give thanks for the blessings we receive in life, we are in a much better position to reach our full potential.

We begin to understand that we are merely pilgrims on our journey through life. We begin to appreciate that nearly everything in life is a gift, to be enjoyed and shared. These gifts can never be hoarded or can never become exclusively ours. When they do we are out of touch with the One who has given us the gift. When we have a sense of gratefulness we are indeed in a healthy place both physically and spiritually. Even when life is difficult we still try and keep a sense of gratefulness for even the tiniest of blessings.

As we move into final part of our journey through Lent, we can use the next two weeks to set aside time to be grateful. Sarah Breathnach puts it so well, "Whatever we are waiting for - peace of mind, contentment, grace, the inner awareness of simple abundance - it will surely come to us, but only when we are ready to receive it with an open and grateful heart." We give thanks to God for blessings received and about to receive: today and throughout the coming week.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Apr-11
Thought For The Week

'Gratefulness is much more than an act, it is a mood that saturates my entire being. My deepest desire is to live every moment in this mood of gratefulness, handing back my whole life in thankfulness to the One who has given me that life.' ~Author unknown

Certain people seem to have this natural inclination of gratefulness. You know it from their body language. They seem at ease with the swings of life, at ease with their contribution to life and seem less inclined to stress when things don't go their way. Getting in touch with a sense of gratefulness is at the heart of nearly every religion. When we give thanks for the blessings we receive in life, we are in a much better position to reach our full potential.

We begin to understand that we are merely pilgrims on our journey through life. We begin to appreciate that nearly everything in life is a gift, to be enjoyed and shared. These gifts can never be hoarded or can never become exclusively ours. When they do we are out of touch with the One who has given us the gift. When we have a sense of gratefulness we are indeed in a healthy place both physically and spiritually. Even when life is difficult we still try and keep a sense of gratefulness for even the tiniest of blessings.

As we move into final part of our journey through Lent, we can use the next two weeks to set aside time to be grateful. Sarah Breathnach puts it so well, "Whatever we are waiting for - peace of mind, contentment, grace, the inner awareness of simple abundance - it will surely come to us, but only when we are ready to receive it with an open and grateful heart." We give thanks to God for blessings received and about to receive: today and throughout the coming week.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Apr-10
Thought For The Week

'Gratefulness is much more than an act, it is a mood that saturates my entire being. My deepest desire is to live every moment in this mood of gratefulness, handing back my whole life in thankfulness to the One who has given me that life.' ~Author unknown

Certain people seem to have this natural inclination of gratefulness. You know it from their body language. They seem at ease with the swings of life, at ease with their contribution to life and seem less inclined to stress when things don't go their way. Getting in touch with a sense of gratefulness is at the heart of nearly every religion. When we give thanks for the blessings we receive in life, we are in a much better position to reach our full potential.

We begin to understand that we are merely pilgrims on our journey through life. We begin to appreciate that nearly everything in life is a gift, to be enjoyed and shared. These gifts can never be hoarded or can never become exclusively ours. When they do we are out of touch with the One who has given us the gift. When we have a sense of gratefulness we are indeed in a healthy place both physically and spiritually. Even when life is difficult we still try and keep a sense of gratefulness for even the tiniest of blessings.

As we move into final part of our journey through Lent, we can use the next two weeks to set aside time to be grateful. Sarah Breathnach puts it so well, "Whatever we are waiting for - peace of mind, contentment, grace, the inner awareness of simple abundance - it will surely come to us, but only when we are ready to receive it with an open and grateful heart." We give thanks to God for blessings received and about to receive: today and throughout the coming week.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Apr-09
Thought For The Week

'Gratefulness is much more than an act, it is a mood that saturates my entire being. My deepest desire is to live every moment in this mood of gratefulness, handing back my whole life in thankfulness to the One who has given me that life.' ~Author unknown

Certain people seem to have this natural inclination of gratefulness. You know it from their body language. They seem at ease with the swings of life, at ease with their contribution to life and seem less inclined to stress when things don't go their way. Getting in touch with a sense of gratefulness is at the heart of nearly every religion. When we give thanks for the blessings we receive in life, we are in a much better position to reach our full potential.

We begin to understand that we are merely pilgrims on our journey through life. We begin to appreciate that nearly everything in life is a gift, to be enjoyed and shared. These gifts can never be hoarded or can never become exclusively ours. When they do we are out of touch with the One who has given us the gift. When we have a sense of gratefulness we are indeed in a healthy place both physically and spiritually. Even when life is difficult we still try and keep a sense of gratefulness for even the tiniest of blessings.

As we move into final part of our journey through Lent, we can use the next two weeks to set aside time to be grateful. Sarah Breathnach puts it so well, "Whatever we are waiting for - peace of mind, contentment, grace, the inner awareness of simple abundance - it will surely come to us, but only when we are ready to receive it with an open and grateful heart." We give thanks to God for blessings received and about to receive: today and throughout the coming week.
 
 
 
  Monday
Apr-08
Thought For The Week

'Gratefulness is much more than an act, it is a mood that saturates my entire being. My deepest desire is to live every moment in this mood of gratefulness, handing back my whole life in thankfulness to the One who has given me that life.' ~Author unknown

Certain people seem to have this natural inclination of gratefulness. You know it from their body language. They seem at ease with the swings of life, at ease with their contribution to life and seem less inclined to stress when things don't go their way. Getting in touch with a sense of gratefulness is at the heart of nearly every religion. When we give thanks for the blessings we receive in life, we are in a much better position to reach our full potential.

We begin to understand that we are merely pilgrims on our journey through life. We begin to appreciate that nearly everything in life is a gift, to be enjoyed and shared. These gifts can never be hoarded or can never become exclusively ours. When they do we are out of touch with the One who has given us the gift. When we have a sense of gratefulness we are indeed in a healthy place both physically and spiritually. Even when life is difficult we still try and keep a sense of gratefulness for even the tiniest of blessings.

As we move into final part of our journey through Lent, we can use the next two weeks to set aside time to be grateful. Sarah Breathnach puts it so well, "Whatever we are waiting for - peace of mind, contentment, grace, the inner awareness of simple abundance - it will surely come to us, but only when we are ready to receive it with an open and grateful heart." We give thanks to God for blessings received and about to receive: today and throughout the coming week.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Apr-07
'Ring the bells that still can ring. There is crack in everything, that's how the light gets in.'~Leonard Cohen

The image of a crack is a powerful one. A crack is often seen in negative terms. It's something we see as a task, something that needs to be repaired. We sometimes speak of a crack in our lives, some area where we are struggling and an area we would like to improve. But every crack has the ability to let the light in. From God's point of view we take it a step further and say that this light has the ability to penetrate our deepest darkness. This is what Easter is all about. Darkness and evil can never win the battle. At times it may seem they have the upper hand but our faith and the Resurrection story shatters this notion. Today we invite God's light into all the cracks in our lives.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Apr-06
Thought For The Week

'Which is better to have - a clock that gains twenty seconds each day or the one that does not work at all?'

Answer: The clock that is broken will be the better of the two. Although it does not work, this clock will show the correct time twice each day. The clock that gains twenty seconds every day is right only once every 5 years and 328 days. Every single one of us has our weaker points, limitations, faults and mistakes. Some of these we are encouraged to let go of and some we have to live with.

Like a broken clock that tells the correct time each day our weaker points can also be points of growth and strength. Even when we get it wrong God always wants to point us in the right direction. We are never condemned, judged or made feel guilty. Others may try but never God. With the clocks having gone forward an hour this weekend, the spotlight is very much on time. Already the MEP's of Europe have voted to scrap the practice of moving clocks forward by an hour in spring and back again in the autumn from April 2021. Apparently the time change does affect our bodies and puts them out of sync. Some people are more sensitive that others to these changes including babies and young children.

Time as we know is a precious gift with huge spiritual significance. Each day a precious gift of time is given to us to use well and to use carefully. Every day is a new beginning. The very structure of a 24 hour day reveals the goodness of God who always invites us and empowers us to begin again. Hope is reborn with every sunrise. Each evening also invites honest reflection and a time to give thanks for blessings received throughout the day. As we continue our journey through Lent, we make an effort to appreciate the gift of time and we pray for the ability to use it in the best way we can.
 
 
 
  Friday
Apr-05
Thought For The Week

'Which is better to have - a clock that gains twenty seconds each day or the one that does not work at all?'

Answer: The clock that is broken will be the better of the two. Although it does not work, this clock will show the correct time twice each day. The clock that gains twenty seconds every day is right only once every 5 years and 328 days. Every single one of us has our weaker points, limitations, faults and mistakes. Some of these we are encouraged to let go of and some we have to live with.

Like a broken clock that tells the correct time each day our weaker points can also be points of growth and strength. Even when we get it wrong God always wants to point us in the right direction. We are never condemned, judged or made feel guilty. Others may try but never God. With the clocks having gone forward an hour this weekend, the spotlight is very much on time. Already the MEP's of Europe have voted to scrap the practice of moving clocks forward by an hour in spring and back again in the autumn from April 2021. Apparently the time change does affect our bodies and puts them out of sync. Some people are more sensitive that others to these changes including babies and young children.

Time as we know is a precious gift with huge spiritual significance. Each day a precious gift of time is given to us to use well and to use carefully. Every day is a new beginning. The very structure of a 24 hour day reveals the goodness of God who always invites us and empowers us to begin again. Hope is reborn with every sunrise. Each evening also invites honest reflection and a time to give thanks for blessings received throughout the day. As we continue our journey through Lent, we make an effort to appreciate the gift of time and we pray for the ability to use it in the best way we can.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Apr-04
Thought For The Week

'Which is better to have - a clock that gains twenty seconds each day or the one that does not work at all?'

Answer: The clock that is broken will be the better of the two. Although it does not work, this clock will show the correct time twice each day. The clock that gains twenty seconds every day is right only once every 5 years and 328 days. Every single one of us has our weaker points, limitations, faults and mistakes. Some of these we are encouraged to let go of and some we have to live with.

Like a broken clock that tells the correct time each day our weaker points can also be points of growth and strength. Even when we get it wrong God always wants to point us in the right direction. We are never condemned, judged or made feel guilty. Others may try but never God. With the clocks having gone forward an hour this weekend, the spotlight is very much on time. Already the MEP's of Europe have voted to scrap the practice of moving clocks forward by an hour in spring and back again in the autumn from April 2021. Apparently the time change does affect our bodies and puts them out of sync. Some people are more sensitive that others to these changes including babies and young children.

Time as we know is a precious gift with huge spiritual significance. Each day a precious gift of time is given to us to use well and to use carefully. Every day is a new beginning. The very structure of a 24 hour day reveals the goodness of God who always invites us and empowers us to begin again. Hope is reborn with every sunrise. Each evening also invites honest reflection and a time to give thanks for blessings received throughout the day. As we continue our journey through Lent, we make an effort to appreciate the gift of time and we pray for the ability to use it in the best way we can.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Apr-03
Thought For The Week

'Which is better to have - a clock that gains twenty seconds each day or the one that does not work at all?'

Answer: The clock that is broken will be the better of the two. Although it does not work, this clock will show the correct time twice each day. The clock that gains twenty seconds every day is right only once every 5 years and 328 days. Every single one of us has our weaker points, limitations, faults and mistakes. Some of these we are encouraged to let go of and some we have to live with.

Like a broken clock that tells the correct time each day our weaker points can also be points of growth and strength. Even when we get it wrong God always wants to point us in the right direction. We are never condemned, judged or made feel guilty. Others may try but never God. With the clocks having gone forward an hour this weekend, the spotlight is very much on time. Already the MEP's of Europe have voted to scrap the practice of moving clocks forward by an hour in spring and back again in the autumn from April 2021. Apparently the time change does affect our bodies and puts them out of sync. Some people are more sensitive that others to these changes including babies and young children.

Time as we know is a precious gift with huge spiritual significance. Each day a precious gift of time is given to us to use well and to use carefully. Every day is a new beginning. The very structure of a 24 hour day reveals the goodness of God who always invites us and empowers us to begin again. Hope is reborn with every sunrise. Each evening also invites honest reflection and a time to give thanks for blessings received throughout the day. As we continue our journey through Lent, we make an effort to appreciate the gift of time and we pray for the ability to use it in the best way we can.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Apr-02
Thought For The Week

'Which is better to have - a clock that gains twenty seconds each day or the one that does not work at all?'

Answer: The clock that is broken will be the better of the two. Although it does not work, this clock will show the correct time twice each day. The clock that gains twenty seconds every day is right only once every 5 years and 328 days. Every single one of us has our weaker points, limitations, faults and mistakes. Some of these we are encouraged to let go of and some we have to live with.

Like a broken clock that tells the correct time each day our weaker points can also be points of growth and strength. Even when we get it wrong God always wants to point us in the right direction. We are never condemned, judged or made feel guilty. Others may try but never God. With the clocks having gone forward an hour this weekend, the spotlight is very much on time. Already the MEP's of Europe have voted to scrap the practice of moving clocks forward by an hour in spring and back again in the autumn from April 2021. Apparently the time change does affect our bodies and puts them out of sync. Some people are more sensitive that others to these changes including babies and young children.

Time as we know is a precious gift with huge spiritual significance. Each day a precious gift of time is given to us to use well and to use carefully. Every day is a new beginning. The very structure of a 24 hour day reveals the goodness of God who always invites us and empowers us to begin again. Hope is reborn with every sunrise. Each evening also invites honest reflection and a time to give thanks for blessings received throughout the day. As we continue our journey through Lent, we make an effort to appreciate the gift of time and we pray for the ability to use it in the best way we can.
 
 
 
  Monday
Apr-01
Thought For The Week

'Which is better to have - a clock that gains twenty seconds each day or the one that does not work at all?'

Answer: The clock that is broken will be the better of the two. Although it does not work, this clock will show the correct time twice each day. The clock that gains twenty seconds every day is right only once every 5 years and 328 days. Every single one of us has our weaker points, limitations, faults and mistakes. Some of these we are encouraged to let go of and some we have to live with.

Like a broken clock that tells the correct time each day our weaker points can also be points of growth and strength. Even when we get it wrong God always wants to point us in the right direction. We are never condemned, judged or made feel guilty. Others may try but never God. With the clocks having gone forward an hour this weekend, the spotlight is very much on time. Already the MEP's of Europe have voted to scrap the practice of moving clocks forward by an hour in spring and back again in the autumn from April 2021. Apparently the time change does affect our bodies and puts them out of sync. Some people are more sensitive that others to these changes including babies and young children.

Time as we know is a precious gift with huge spiritual significance. Each day a precious gift of time is given to us to use well and to use carefully. Every day is a new beginning. The very structure of a 24 hour day reveals the goodness of God who always invites us and empowers us to begin again. Hope is reborn with every sunrise. Each evening also invites honest reflection and a time to give thanks for blessings received throughout the day. As we continue our journey through Lent, we make an effort to appreciate the gift of time and we pray for the ability to use it in the best way we can.
 
 

 

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