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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing November - 2017
 
  Monday
Nov-20
Thought For Week

'Always be yourself, express yourself, have faith in yourself, do not go out and look for a successful personality and duplicate it.' ~Bruce Lee

In working with young people, it is a privilege to hear and listen to their stories. They find it so good to be able to share, to know that they will not be judged and to know that they will be listened to. The two bits of advice that I often find myself sharing with them is 'Be yourself' and 'That it's ok to say no'. I came across this reflection during the week. It's not just relevant for young people but for everyone.

Some rights....

I do not have to feel guilty just because someone else does not like what I do, say, think or feel.
It's ok for me to feel angry and to express it in responsible ways.
I have the right to say I don't understand without feeling stupid or guilty.
I have the right to say I don't know.
I have the right to say no without feeling guilty.
I do not have to apologise or give reasons when I say no.
I have the right to refuse requests which others make of me.
I have the right to tell others when I think they are manipulating, cunning or treating me unfairly.
I have the right to refuse additional responsibilities without feeling guilty.
I have the right to tell others when their behaviour annoys or upsets me.
I have the right to make mistakes and to be responsible for them.
I have the right to be wrong.
I do not have to be liked, admired or respected by everyone for everything I do.
I have the right to admit that I'm human with limitations and weaknesses and not pretend that everything is just right.



Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Sunday
Nov-19
Thought For The Week

'November is the pause button of the year, if we could but open our hearts to it. It comes to us, not wrapped in the glowing colours of other seasons, but in sombre, dark tones.' ~Charlie Meagher

Not many would put November down as their favourite month. It is easy to see why. All around the landscape is bleak and bare, our gardens are empty of colour, and we feel starved of light and long for those warm summer days. We try and distract ourselves away from the dreariness of November by simply being busy. But it is our loss if we try and run away from what November has to offer. It offers us the invitation to pause, to look at our own lives and to think about those parts of our lives that also feel bleak, cold and in darkness.

Our faith reminds us how God journeys with us in the right now. Nothing else matters. For all of us the right now is a massive collection of joys, sorrows, pain, happiness, struggles, hopes, fears, weakness, fun, relaxation, anger, freedom, disappointments and so on. It can be a scary place and it can also be so exciting. We're in there somewhere and so is God. It would be very limiting, if we thought that God only chose to be with us during the good days. It's in the middle of our darkest hour that God is also particularly near.

Through out this coming week we can also brighten up someone's November day by making the most of the smaller moments. Maybe something as simple as a phone call, a smile, a text, calling to a friend or neighbour, a word of encouragement or a word of support is all that is needed. It won't make news headlines but for the recipient it could make their day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Friday
Nov-17
Thought For The Week

'November is the pause button of the year, if we could but open our hearts to it. It comes to us, not wrapped in the glowing colours of other seasons, but in sombre, dark tones.' ~Charlie Meagher

Not many would put November down as their favourite month. It is easy to see why. All around the landscape is bleak and bare, our gardens are empty of colour, and we feel starved of light and long for those warm summer days. We try and distract ourselves away from the dreariness of November by simply being busy. But it is our loss if we try and run away from what November has to offer. It offers us the invitation to pause, to look at our own lives and to think about those parts of our lives that also feel bleak, cold and in darkness.

Our faith reminds us how God journeys with us in the right now. Nothing else matters. For all of us the right now is a massive collection of joys, sorrows, pain, happiness, struggles, hopes, fears, weakness, fun, relaxation, anger, freedom, disappointments and so on. It can be a scary place and it can also be so exciting. We're in there somewhere and so is God. It would be very limiting, if we thought that God only chose to be with us during the good days. It's in the middle of our darkest hour that God is also particularly near.

Through out this coming week we can also brighten up someone's November day by making the most of the smaller moments. Maybe something as simple as a phone call, a smile, a text, calling to a friend or neighbour, a word of encouragement or a word of support is all that is needed. It won't make news headlines but for the recipient it could make their day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Thursday
Nov-16
Thought For The Week

'November is the pause button of the year, if we could but open our hearts to it. It comes to us, not wrapped in the glowing colours of other seasons, but in sombre, dark tones.' ~Charlie Meagher

Not many would put November down as their favourite month. It is easy to see why. All around the landscape is bleak and bare, our gardens are empty of colour, and we feel starved of light and long for those warm summer days. We try and distract ourselves away from the dreariness of November by simply being busy. But it is our loss if we try and run away from what November has to offer. It offers us the invitation to pause, to look at our own lives and to think about those parts of our lives that also feel bleak, cold and in darkness.

Our faith reminds us how God journeys with us in the right now. Nothing else matters. For all of us the right now is a massive collection of joys, sorrows, pain, happiness, struggles, hopes, fears, weakness, fun, relaxation, anger, freedom, disappointments and so on. It can be a scary place and it can also be so exciting. We're in there somewhere and so is God. It would be very limiting, if we thought that God only chose to be with us during the good days. It's in the middle of our darkest hour that God is also particularly near.

Through out this coming week we can also brighten up someone's November day by making the most of the smaller moments. Maybe something as simple as a phone call, a smile, a text, calling to a friend or neighbour, a word of encouragement or a word of support is all that is needed. It won't make news headlines but for the recipient it could make their day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Nov-15
Thought For The Week

'November is the pause button of the year, if we could but open our hearts to it. It comes to us, not wrapped in the glowing colours of other seasons, but in sombre, dark tones.' ~Charlie Meagher

Not many would put November down as their favourite month. It is easy to see why. All around the landscape is bleak and bare, our gardens are empty of colour, and we feel starved of light and long for those warm summer days. We try and distract ourselves away from the dreariness of November by simply being busy. But it is our loss if we try and run away from what November has to offer. It offers us the invitation to pause, to look at our own lives and to think about those parts of our lives that also feel bleak, cold and in darkness.

Our faith reminds us how God journeys with us in the right now. Nothing else matters. For all of us the right now is a massive collection of joys, sorrows, pain, happiness, struggles, hopes, fears, weakness, fun, relaxation, anger, freedom, disappointments and so on. It can be a scary place and it can also be so exciting. We're in there somewhere and so is God. It would be very limiting, if we thought that God only chose to be with us during the good days. It's in the middle of our darkest hour that God is also particularly near.

Through out this coming week we can also brighten up someone's November day by making the most of the smaller moments. Maybe something as simple as a phone call, a smile, a text, calling to a friend or neighbour, a word of encouragement or a word of support is all that is needed. It won't make news headlines but for the recipient it could make their day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Nov-14
Thought For The Week

'November is the pause button of the year, if we could but open our hearts to it. It comes to us, not wrapped in the glowing colours of other seasons, but in sombre, dark tones.' ~Charlie Meagher

Not many would put November down as their favourite month. It is easy to see why. All around the landscape is bleak and bare, our gardens are empty of colour, and we feel starved of light and long for those warm summer days. We try and distract ourselves away from the dreariness of November by simply being busy. But it is our loss if we try and run away from what November has to offer. It offers us the invitation to pause, to look at our own lives and to think about those parts of our lives that also feel bleak, cold and in darkness.

Our faith reminds us how God journeys with us in the right now. Nothing else matters. For all of us the right now is a massive collection of joys, sorrows, pain, happiness, struggles, hopes, fears, weakness, fun, relaxation, anger, freedom, disappointments and so on. It can be a scary place and it can also be so exciting. We're in there somewhere and so is God. It would be very limiting, if we thought that God only chose to be with us during the good days. It's in the middle of our darkest hour that God is also particularly near.

Through out this coming week we can also brighten up someone's November day by making the most of the smaller moments. Maybe something as simple as a phone call, a smile, a text, calling to a friend or neighbour, a word of encouragement or a word of support is all that is needed. It won't make news headlines but for the recipient it could make their day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Monday
Nov-13
Thought For The Week

'November is the pause button of the year, if we could but open our hearts to it. It comes to us, not wrapped in the glowing colours of other seasons, but in sombre, dark tones.' ~Charlie Meagher

Not many would put November down as their favourite month. It is easy to see why. All around the landscape is bleak and bare, our gardens are empty of colour, and we feel starved of light and long for those warm summer days. We try and distract ourselves away from the dreariness of November by simply being busy. But it is our loss if we try and run away from what November has to offer. It offers us the invitation to pause, to look at our own lives and to think about those parts of our lives that also feel bleak, cold and in darkness.

Our faith reminds us how God journeys with us in the right now. Nothing else matters. For all of us the right now is a massive collection of joys, sorrows, pain, happiness, struggles, hopes, fears, weakness, fun, relaxation, anger, freedom, disappointments and so on. It can be a scary place and it can also be so exciting. We're in there somewhere and so is God. It would be very limiting, if we thought that God only chose to be with us during the good days. It's in the middle of our darkest hour that God is also particularly near.

Through out this coming week we can also brighten up someone's November day by making the most of the smaller moments. Maybe something as simple as a phone call, a smile, a text, calling to a friend or neighbour, a word of encouragement or a word of support is all that is needed. It won't make news headlines but for the recipient it could make their day.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Sunday
Nov-12
Our Thought For Today is by Triona Doherty

'It's a terrible thing, I think, in life to wait until you're ready. I have this feeling now that actually no one is ever ready to do anything. There is almost no such thing as ready. There is only now. And you may as well do it now. Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' ~ Hugh Laurie

I'm not ready - we all think it or say it from time to time. It could be as simple as not being able to find your shoes to leave the house, or a more serious situation like being under-prepared for a work presentation. It can also refer to our emotional state - we might not be ready to talk about an experience, to change a habit, to enter into a relationship, or to let go of a loved one. No one else can tell us if we are ready for a situation or not. It is something only we know. But there is some wisdom in the quote above, in that sometimes we need to push ourselves, to just dive in.

The parable in today's gospel pits two groups in stark contrast - the foolish bridesmaids who failed to prepare, and the sensible ones who were ready with their lamps and oil. Both groups fell asleep on the job, but only one group had laid the groundwork and so were ready for action. Jesus tells us we need to be watchful and ready. As well as having the light of faith, we need the fuel - the actions - to keep it lit so we are ready when the Lord comes.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Nov-11
Thought For The Week

The following poem/reflection is called 'Walking With Grief' by Andy Raine taken from this months Reality magazine.

Do not hurry as you walk with grief, it does not help the journey.
Walk slowly, pausing often;
Do not hurry as you walk with grief.

Be not disturbed by memories that come unbidden.
Swiftly forgive;
and let Christ speak for you unspoken words.
Unfinished conversation will be resolved in him.
Be not disturbed.

Be gentle with the one who walks with grief.
If it is you, be gentle with yourself.
Swiftly forgive;
walk slowly, pausing often.

Take time and be gentle
as you walk with grief.


______________________________________________________


'We believe that all the ties of friendship and affection which knit us as one throughout our lives do not end with death. Confident that God always remembers the good we have done and forgives our sins, let us pray, asking God to gather our loved ones to eternal life.' ~Prayer of the Church for those who have died

We have just begun our journey through November. Traditionally it is a month when we remember and pray for those who have died. Some might say that such a tradition is morbid and outdated. But evidence at ground level would say that for many people it is a hugely important tradition. Many find it comforting and consoling to have prayers for their loved ones said. Many more find it comforting to visit the grave of a loved one, light a candle, bring some flowers, say a quiet prayer or flick through a photo album to touch in on memories. How we mark this month of November in remembering those who have died is always going to be personal. Whatever works for us is good.

The one common link we all have is the loss and how we miss our nearest and dearest. The loss often goes beyond words and November is a month when we can find meaningful ways of expressing this loss. Our prayers for those who have died is also a good thing. In prayer we stand in God's presence and in praying for those who have died we are in some way connected with them. Our nearest and dearest who have gone on before us, will always have a special place in our hearts. They will never be forgotten. May they rest in peace.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Friday
Nov-10
Thought For The Week

The following poem/reflection is called 'Walking With Grief' by Andy Raine taken from this months Reality magazine.

Do not hurry as you walk with grief, it does not help the journey.
Walk slowly, pausing often;
Do not hurry as you walk with grief.

Be not disturbed by memories that come unbidden.
Swiftly forgive;
and let Christ speak for you unspoken words.
Unfinished conversation will be resolved in him.
Be not disturbed.

Be gentle with the one who walks with grief.
If it is you, be gentle with yourself.
Swiftly forgive;
walk slowly, pausing often.

Take time and be gentle
as you walk with grief.


______________________________________________________


'We believe that all the ties of friendship and affection which knit us as one throughout our lives do not end with death. Confident that God always remembers the good we have done and forgives our sins, let us pray, asking God to gather our loved ones to eternal life.' ~Prayer of the Church for those who have died

We have just begun our journey through November. Traditionally it is a month when we remember and pray for those who have died. Some might say that such a tradition is morbid and outdated. But evidence at ground level would say that for many people it is a hugely important tradition. Many find it comforting and consoling to have prayers for their loved ones said. Many more find it comforting to visit the grave of a loved one, light a candle, bring some flowers, say a quiet prayer or flick through a photo album to touch in on memories. How we mark this month of November in remembering those who have died is always going to be personal. Whatever works for us is good.

The one common link we all have is the loss and how we miss our nearest and dearest. The loss often goes beyond words and November is a month when we can find meaningful ways of expressing this loss. Our prayers for those who have died is also a good thing. In prayer we stand in God's presence and in praying for those who have died we are in some way connected with them. Our nearest and dearest who have gone on before us, will always have a special place in our hearts. They will never be forgotten. May they rest in peace.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Thursday
Nov-09
Thought For The Week

The following poem/reflection is called 'Walking With Grief' by Andy Raine taken from this months Reality magazine.

Do not hurry as you walk with grief, it does not help the journey.
Walk slowly, pausing often;
Do not hurry as you walk with grief.

Be not disturbed by memories that come unbidden.
Swiftly forgive;
and let Christ speak for you unspoken words.
Unfinished conversation will be resolved in him.
Be not disturbed.

Be gentle with the one who walks with grief.
If it is you, be gentle with yourself.
Swiftly forgive;
walk slowly, pausing often.

Take time and be gentle
as you walk with grief.


______________________________________________________


'We believe that all the ties of friendship and affection which knit us as one throughout our lives do not end with death. Confident that God always remembers the good we have done and forgives our sins, let us pray, asking God to gather our loved ones to eternal life.' ~Prayer of the Church for those who have died

We have just begun our journey through November. Traditionally it is a month when we remember and pray for those who have died. Some might say that such a tradition is morbid and outdated. But evidence at ground level would say that for many people it is a hugely important tradition. Many find it comforting and consoling to have prayers for their loved ones said. Many more find it comforting to visit the grave of a loved one, light a candle, bring some flowers, say a quiet prayer or flick through a photo album to touch in on memories. How we mark this month of November in remembering those who have died is always going to be personal. Whatever works for us is good.

The one common link we all have is the loss and how we miss our nearest and dearest. The loss often goes beyond words and November is a month when we can find meaningful ways of expressing this loss. Our prayers for those who have died is also a good thing. In prayer we stand in God's presence and in praying for those who have died we are in some way connected with them. Our nearest and dearest who have gone on before us, will always have a special place in our hearts. They will never be forgotten. May they rest in peace.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Nov-08
Thought For The Week

The following poem/reflection is called 'Walking With Grief' by Andy Raine taken from this months Reality magazine.

Do not hurry as you walk with grief, it does not help the journey.
Walk slowly, pausing often;
Do not hurry as you walk with grief.

Be not disturbed by memories that come unbidden.
Swiftly forgive;
and let Christ speak for you unspoken words.
Unfinished conversation will be resolved in him.
Be not disturbed.

Be gentle with the one who walks with grief.
If it is you, be gentle with yourself.
Swiftly forgive;
walk slowly, pausing often.

Take time and be gentle
as you walk with grief.


______________________________________________________


'We believe that all the ties of friendship and affection which knit us as one throughout our lives do not end with death. Confident that God always remembers the good we have done and forgives our sins, let us pray, asking God to gather our loved ones to eternal life.' ~Prayer of the Church for those who have died

We have just begun our journey through November. Traditionally it is a month when we remember and pray for those who have died. Some might say that such a tradition is morbid and outdated. But evidence at ground level would say that for many people it is a hugely important tradition. Many find it comforting and consoling to have prayers for their loved ones said. Many more find it comforting to visit the grave of a loved one, light a candle, bring some flowers, say a quiet prayer or flick through a photo album to touch in on memories. How we mark this month of November in remembering those who have died is always going to be personal. Whatever works for us is good.

The one common link we all have is the loss and how we miss our nearest and dearest. The loss often goes beyond words and November is a month when we can find meaningful ways of expressing this loss. Our prayers for those who have died is also a good thing. In prayer we stand in God's presence and in praying for those who have died we are in some way connected with them. Our nearest and dearest who have gone on before us, will always have a special place in our hearts. They will never be forgotten. May they rest in peace.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Nov-07
Thought For The Week

The following poem/reflection is called 'Walking With Grief' by Andy Raine taken from this months Reality magazine.

Do not hurry as you walk with grief, it does not help the journey.
Walk slowly, pausing often;
Do not hurry as you walk with grief.

Be not disturbed by memories that come unbidden.
Swiftly forgive;
and let Christ speak for you unspoken words.
Unfinished conversation will be resolved in him.
Be not disturbed.

Be gentle with the one who walks with grief.
If it is you, be gentle with yourself.
Swiftly forgive;
walk slowly, pausing often.

Take time and be gentle
as you walk with grief.


______________________________________________________


'We believe that all the ties of friendship and affection which knit us as one throughout our lives do not end with death. Confident that God always remembers the good we have done and forgives our sins, let us pray, asking God to gather our loved ones to eternal life.' ~Prayer of the Church for those who have died

We have just begun our journey through November. Traditionally it is a month when we remember and pray for those who have died. Some might say that such a tradition is morbid and outdated. But evidence at ground level would say that for many people it is a hugely important tradition. Many find it comforting and consoling to have prayers for their loved ones said. Many more find it comforting to visit the grave of a loved one, light a candle, bring some flowers, say a quiet prayer or flick through a photo album to touch in on memories. How we mark this month of November in remembering those who have died is always going to be personal. Whatever works for us is good.

The one common link we all have is the loss and how we miss our nearest and dearest. The loss often goes beyond words and November is a month when we can find meaningful ways of expressing this loss. Our prayers for those who have died is also a good thing. In prayer we stand in God's presence and in praying for those who have died we are in some way connected with them. Our nearest and dearest who have gone on before us, will always have a special place in our hearts. They will never be forgotten. May they rest in peace.
 
 
 
  Monday
Nov-06
Thought For The Week

The following poem/reflection is called 'Walking With Grief' by Andy Raine taken from this months Reality magazine.

Do not hurry as you walk with grief, it does not help the journey.
Walk slowly, pausing often;
Do not hurry as you walk with grief.

Be not disturbed by memories that come unbidden.
Swiftly forgive;
and let Christ speak for you unspoken words.
Unfinished conversation will be resolved in him.
Be not disturbed.

Be gentle with the one who walks with grief.
If it is you, be gentle with yourself.
Swiftly forgive;
walk slowly, pausing often.

Take time and be gentle
as you walk with grief.


______________________________________________________


'We believe that all the ties of friendship and affection which knit us as one throughout our lives do not end with death. Confident that God always remembers the good we have done and forgives our sins, let us pray, asking God to gather our loved ones to eternal life.' ~Prayer of the Church for those who have died

We have just begun our journey through November. Traditionally it is a month when we remember and pray for those who have died. Some might say that such a tradition is morbid and outdated. But evidence at ground level would say that for many people it is a hugely important tradition. Many find it comforting and consoling to have prayers for their loved ones said. Many more find it comforting to visit the grave of a loved one, light a candle, bring some flowers, say a quiet prayer or flick through a photo album to touch in on memories. How we mark this month of November in remembering those who have died is always going to be personal. Whatever works for us is good.

The one common link we all have is the loss and how we miss our nearest and dearest. The loss often goes beyond words and November is a month when we can find meaningful ways of expressing this loss. Our prayers for those who have died is also a good thing. In prayer we stand in God's presence and in praying for those who have died we are in some way connected with them. Our nearest and dearest who have gone on before us, will always have a special place in our hearts. They will never be forgotten. May they rest in peace.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Nov-05
Thought For Today is by Triona Doherty called 'Practise what you preach'

We have all heard the expression 'Do as I say, not as I do'. According to one online dictionary, it is 'an expression used to call out hypocrites, including "environmentalists" with private jets, politicians who send their children to private school while opposing measures to give other kids the same chance, or those who accuse others of racism while not hiring minorities'. We could all come up with examples of people who do not practise what they preach.

The accusation appears to have been made for the Scribes and the Pharisees that Jesus talks about in today's gospel. He criticises them for placing heavy burdens on people, while not lifting a finger to help them, and for making themselves look important in order to attract attention. If we are honest with ourselves, there are areas of our own lives where we value style over substance, where we wish to give a certain impression to others that does not reflect the truth of the matter. We like to look good, and for people to think highly of us.

There are also times when we do not live up to the expectations we set for others. We expect people to be honest and fair with us, yet we are not always honest in our dealings with others. We expect others to help us, but we might not always repay the favour. Today's gospel is a wake-up call. It tells us what Jesus expects of us. We must be humble and genuine, thinking of others rather than worrying about what people will think of us.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Nov-02
Thought For The Week

'Time is what we want most, but what we use worst.' ~William Penn

Our clocks went back an hour in the early hours of Sunday morning. An extra hour in bed over the Bank Holiday weekend was welcomed by many, but getting dark early now can also be dreary for some. The moving of clocks and time was first introduced during World War One. The measure was introduced to conserve coal and it was also brought in to ensure that children walking to school in the mornings did not do so in the dark. The further north you are from the equator, the greater the loss of light during the winter months.

We have control over many things in life but not time. While we may move our clocks back this weekend, time always ticks forward. How we use our time is something we can be much more in control of. Do we use our time well, creatively and meaningfully? Or do we waste our time and drift aimlessly taking everything for granted?

We begin the month of November today marking Halloween and All Saints Day. For many people time is used well during November, to remember with love those who have died. This is quality time; it is time to reflect, to pause, to remember with love, to pray and to cherish the memories of our loved ones who have died.

During this coming month of November many will visit a cemetery, say a prayer for a loved one who has died and decorate a grave with a flower or a nightlight. Whether or not one should pray for the dead is a question that is sometimes asked. The simple answer is that any prayer is always good. When we pray for those who have died, we are reaching out in love to that person, who was precious and special in our lives. In prayer we stand in God's presence and in praying for those who have died we are in some way connected with them. Our nearest and dearest who have gone on before us will always have a special place in our hearts. They will never be forgotten. May they rest in peace.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday with a photo change each day
 
 

 

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