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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing July - 2017
 
  Tuesday
Jul-25
Jesus put a parable before the crowds, 'The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field. While everybody was asleep his enemy came, sowed darnel all among the wheat, and made off. When the new wheat sprouted and ripened, the darnel appeared as well. The owner's servants went to him and said, "Sir, was it not good seed that you sowed in your field? If so, where does the darnel come from?" "Some enemy has done this" he answered. And the servants said, "Do you want us to go and weed it out?" But he said, "No, because when you weed out the darnel you might pull up the wheat with it. Let them both grow till the harvest; and at harvest time I shall say to the reapers: First collect the darnel and tie it in bundles to be burnt, then gather the wheat into my barn." ~Matthew 13:24-27

Seeds have been a part of farming, gardening and life for thousand of years. But seeds have now become a cause of concern and worry. Across the world today, just three companies sell more than half of all seeds available. These seed companies are buying up all the smaller ones giving these giant companies total dominance. As a result diversity of crops is on a serious decline.

Worse again these companies have patents on the seeds. This means you can't use your extra seeds for next years crop. The patent on the seeds means you don't own them and so you can't use them. This forces you to buy more seed from these seed companies. For hundreds and thousands of poor farmers across the world it means they will always be in poverty with no way out

In contrast to this The Irish Seed Savers Association based in Scariff, Co.Clare, have put massive work into protecting the diversity of Irish seeds. They have seeds from every variety of vegetables, flowers, grain, potatoes and fruit trees. Their work ensures the protection of hundreds of of food crop varieties that are suitable for Irish growing conditions. Their work also ensures that big seed companies do not dominate the market.

Jesus also uses the example of seeds throughout the Gospel stories. The parable of the wheat and darnel is one of the better known ones. An equivalent of darnel today would be 'Japanese Knotweed' - no one wants this invasive plant growing in your garden. But seeds do get mixed up, just like good and evil. We are all aware how bad news dominates the headlines and the good news gets squeezed out. We must never let this happen.

Jesus reminds us both good and evil are mixed together and we have to live with both for now. It is up to every single one of us to celebrate good news, to nurture good news, to praise good news, to welcome good news and to make sure our good news and especially your good news never gets squeezed out or taken for granted.

Finally every seed is small but contains so much potential. So many good stories are small too but that should never take away from their significance. When you nurture good news, you harness the potential and great things begin to happen. This is exactly what Jesus wanted to do and encourages each of us to do the same. The place to start is not next month or next week but today.
 
 
 
  Monday
Jul-24
Jesus put a parable before the crowds, 'The kingdom of heaven may be compared to a man who sowed good seed in his field. While everybody was asleep his enemy came, sowed darnel all among the wheat, and made off. When the new wheat sprouted and ripened, the darnel appeared as well. The owner's servants went to him and said, "Sir, was it not good seed that you sowed in your field? If so, where does the darnel come from?" "Some enemy has done this" he answered. And the servants said, "Do you want us to go and weed it out?" But he said, "No, because when you weed out the darnel you might pull up the wheat with it. Let them both grow till the harvest; and at harvest time I shall say to the reapers: First collect the darnel and tie it in bundles to be burnt, then gather the wheat into my barn." ~Matthew 13:24-27

Seeds have been a part of farming, gardening and life for thousand of years. But seeds have now become a cause of concern and worry. Across the world today, just three companies sell more than half of all seeds available. These seed companies are buying up all the smaller ones giving these giant companies total dominance. As a result diversity of crops is on a serious decline.

Worse again these companies have patents on the seeds. This means you can't use your extra seeds for next years crop. The patent on the seeds means you don't own them and so you can't use them. This forces you to buy more seed from these seed companies. For hundreds and thousands of poor farmers across the world it means they will always be in poverty with no way out

In contrast to this The Irish Seed Savers Association based in Scariff, Co.Clare, have put massive work into protecting the diversity of Irish seeds. They have seeds from every variety of vegetables, flowers, grain, potatoes and fruit trees. Their work ensures the protection of hundreds of of food crop varieties that are suitable for Irish growing conditions. Their work also ensures that big seed companies do not dominate the market.

Jesus also uses the example of seeds throughout the Gospel stories. The parable of the wheat and darnel is one of the better known ones. An equivalent of darnel today would be 'Japanese Knotweed' - no one wants this invasive plant growing in your garden. But seeds do get mixed up, just like good and evil. We are all aware how bad news dominates the headlines and the good news gets squeezed out. We must never let this happen.

Jesus reminds us both good and evil are mixed together and we have to live with both for now. It is up to every single one of us to celebrate good news, to nurture good news, to praise good news, to welcome good news and to make sure our good news and especially your good news never gets squeezed out or taken for granted.

Finally every seed is small but contains so much potential. So many good stories are small too but that should never take away from their significance. When you nurture good news, you harness the potential and great things begin to happen. This is exactly what Jesus wanted to do and encourages each of us to do the same. The place to start is not next month or next week but today.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jul-23
'God's love doesn't discriminate, it simply embraces everything. Like the sun it doesn't shine selectively, shedding its warmth on vegetables because they are good and refusing its warmth on the weeds because they are bad. It just shines on everything and irrespective of its condition, receives its warmth.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Words like incredible, brilliant or amazing could be used to describe God's love. To say that God loves us when we are good and that God loves us when we are bad is indeed amazing. But it also throws up some key questions. The first big one is why bother to be good if God loves everyone the same and equally? To bother to be good means that love is always the priority. We aren't loved because we are good, but we become good because we experience love. The more love we experience the better it is for us, our family, our community and the world we live in. We do our best to grow in love, to nurture it, to share it, to celebrate it and to allow it shape us into the wonderful person God created us to be.

Sure enough, we sometimes stumble and sometimes fall spectacularly. Does this mean that we should abandon the road of love that guides us each day? Of course not! The same goes with God. God loves the sinner but hates the sin. There is a big difference between the two. So today should be a day to begin to believe in you, to believe in God's love for you and to believe that now is the time to start again, even after a stumble or fall in your life.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Jul-22
'God's love doesn't discriminate, it simply embraces everything. Like the sun it doesn't shine selectively, shedding its warmth on vegetables because they are good and refusing its warmth on the weeds because they are bad. It just shines on everything and irrespective of its condition, receives its warmth.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Words like incredible, brilliant or amazing could be used to describe God's love. To say that God loves us when we are good and that God loves us when we are bad is indeed amazing. But it also throws up some key questions. The first big one is why bother to be good if God loves everyone the same and equally? To bother to be good means that love is always the priority. We aren't loved because we are good, but we become good because we experience love. The more love we experience the better it is for us, our family, our community and the world we live in. We do our best to grow in love, to nurture it, to share it, to celebrate it and to allow it shape us into the wonderful person God created us to be.

Sure enough, we sometimes stumble and sometimes fall spectacularly. Does this mean that we should abandon the road of love that guides us each day? Of course not! The same goes with God. God loves the sinner but hates the sin. There is a big difference between the two. So today should be a day to begin to believe in you, to believe in God's love for you and to believe that now is the time to start again, even after a stumble or fall in your life.
 
 
 
  Friday
Jul-21
'God's love doesn't discriminate, it simply embraces everything. Like the sun it doesn't shine selectively, shedding its warmth on vegetables because they are good and refusing its warmth on the weeds because they are bad. It just shines on everything and irrespective of its condition, receives its warmth.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Words like incredible, brilliant or amazing could be used to describe God's love. To say that God loves us when we are good and that God loves us when we are bad is indeed amazing. But it also throws up some key questions. The first big one is why bother to be good if God loves everyone the same and equally? To bother to be good means that love is always the priority. We aren't loved because we are good, but we become good because we experience love. The more love we experience the better it is for us, our family, our community and the world we live in. We do our best to grow in love, to nurture it, to share it, to celebrate it and to allow it shape us into the wonderful person God created us to be.

Sure enough, we sometimes stumble and sometimes fall spectacularly. Does this mean that we should abandon the road of love that guides us each day? Of course not! The same goes with God. God loves the sinner but hates the sin. There is a big difference between the two. So today should be a day to begin to believe in you, to believe in God's love for you and to believe that now is the time to start again, even after a stumble or fall in your life.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jul-20
'God's love doesn't discriminate, it simply embraces everything. Like the sun it doesn't shine selectively, shedding its warmth on vegetables because they are good and refusing its warmth on the weeds because they are bad. It just shines on everything and irrespective of its condition, receives its warmth.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Words like incredible, brilliant or amazing could be used to describe God's love. To say that God loves us when we are good and that God loves us when we are bad is indeed amazing. But it also throws up some key questions. The first big one is why bother to be good if God loves everyone the same and equally? To bother to be good means that love is always the priority. We aren't loved because we are good, but we become good because we experience love. The more love we experience the better it is for us, our family, our community and the world we live in. We do our best to grow in love, to nurture it, to share it, to celebrate it and to allow it shape us into the wonderful person God created us to be.

Sure enough, we sometimes stumble and sometimes fall spectacularly. Does this mean that we should abandon the road of love that guides us each day? Of course not! The same goes with God. God loves the sinner but hates the sin. There is a big difference between the two. So today should be a day to begin to believe in you, to believe in God's love for you and to believe that now is the time to start again, even after a stumble or fall in your life.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jul-19
'God's love doesn't discriminate, it simply embraces everything. Like the sun it doesn't shine selectively, shedding its warmth on vegetables because they are good and refusing its warmth on the weeds because they are bad. It just shines on everything and irrespective of its condition, receives its warmth.' ~Ronald Rolheiser

Words like incredible, brilliant or amazing could be used to describe God's love. To say that God loves us when we are good and that God loves us when we are bad is indeed amazing. But it also throws up some key questions. The first big one is why bother to be good if God loves everyone the same and equally? To bother to be good means that love is always the priority. We aren't loved because we are good, but we become good because we experience love. The more love we experience the better it is for us, our family, our community and the world we live in. We do our best to grow in love, to nurture it, to share it, to celebrate it and to allow it shape us into the wonderful person God created us to be.

Sure enough, we sometimes stumble and sometimes fall spectacularly. Does this mean that we should abandon the road of love that guides us each day? Of course not! The same goes with God. God loves the sinner but hates the sin. There is a big difference between the two. So today should be a day to begin to believe in you, to believe in God's love for you and to believe that now is the time to start again, even after a stumble or fall in your life.
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jul-18
Thought For The Week

'Cluttered times of prayer wear us out. Instead of being revived in body and soul, as the Lord wants, we can come away weary from our busy praying.' ~from the 'The Simplest Prayer' by the Irish Franciscans

We are all aware of a cluttered house or a cluttered room. We can have stuff thrown everywhere, sometimes things piled on top of each other and not nice to look at. Clutter means energy will struggle to flow; it is stagnant and not good for us in the long run. We have also seen the opposite, of a room that is clutter free. It is bright, clean, it feels positive and the energy can flow freely. Usually such a space is welcoming, warm and a good place to be.

The same applies to prayer too. We can clutter prayer up with lots of words, lists of prayers, novenas and other prayers that we think we should be saying or were told to say. There is nothing of course wrong with our own favourite prayers and it is great if we have these. But if our prayer time is crammed full, then we need to look as to why it is so cluttered. We need to be willing to let go of the stuff that no longer nurtures us spiritually.

It was Jesus himself said; "When you pray do not keep on babbling like pagans, for they think they will be heard because of their many words" (Matthew 6:7). Jesus instead encourages us to keep things as simple as we can, to be open to quieter prayer, to be willing to sit in silence, to listen to some quiet music, to think of those whom we would like included in our prayers and to 'just be', in where ever our prayer place may be.

We don't have to win God over with many words. The invitation is to pray in trust and in simplicity. Probably the most beautiful invitation to such a prayer is another line in Matthews Gospel: "Come to me, all you who labour and are overburdened and I will give you rest" (Matthew 11:29). In the busy, hectic and sometimes cluttered world that we live in, this invitation to turn to the Lord with whatever is going in our lives is simply irresistible.
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jul-13
Thought For The Week

'Cluttered times of prayer wear us out. Instead of being revived in body and soul, as the Lord wants, we can come away weary from our busy praying.' ~from the 'The Simplest Prayer' by the Irish Franciscans

We are all aware of a cluttered house or a cluttered room. We can have stuff thrown everywhere, sometimes things piled on top of each other and not nice to look at. Clutter means energy will struggle to flow; it is stagnant and not good for us in the long run. We have also seen the opposite, of a room that is clutter free. It is bright, clean, it feels positive and the energy can flow freely. Usually such a space is welcoming, warm and a good place to be.

The same applies to prayer too. We can clutter prayer up with lots of words, lists of prayers, novenas and other prayers that we think we should be saying or were told to say. There is nothing of course wrong with our own favourite prayers and it is great if we have these. But if our prayer time is crammed full, then we need to look as to why it is so cluttered. We need to be willing to let go of the stuff that no longer nurtures us spiritually.

It was Jesus himself said; "When you pray do not keep on babbling like pagans, for they think they will be heard because of their many words" (Matthew 6:7). Jesus instead encourages us to keep things as simple as we can, to be open to quieter prayer, to be willing to sit in silence, to listen to some quiet music, to think of those whom we would like included in our prayers and to 'just be', in where ever our prayer place may be.

We don't have to win God over with many words. The invitation is to pray in trust and in simplicity. Probably the most beautiful invitation to such a prayer is another line in Matthews Gospel: "Come to me, all you who labour and are overburdened and I will give you rest" (Matthew 11:29). In the busy, hectic and sometimes cluttered world that we live in, this invitation to turn to the Lord with whatever is going in our lives is simply irresistible.
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jul-12
Thought For The Week

'Cluttered times of prayer wear us out. Instead of being revived in body and soul, as the Lord wants, we can come away weary from our busy praying.' ~from the 'The Simplest Prayer' by the Irish Franciscans

We are all aware of a cluttered house or a cluttered room. We can have stuff thrown everywhere, sometimes things piled on top of each other and not nice to look at. Clutter means energy will struggle to flow; it is stagnant and not good for us in the long run. We have also seen the opposite, of a room that is clutter free. It is bright, clean, it feels positive and the energy can flow freely. Usually such a space is welcoming, warm and a good place to be.

The same applies to prayer too. We can clutter prayer up with lots of words, lists of prayers, novenas and other prayers that we think we should be saying or were told to say. There is nothing of course wrong with our own favourite prayers and it is great if we have these. But if our prayer time is crammed full, then we need to look as to why it is so cluttered. We need to be willing to let go of the stuff that no longer nurtures us spiritually.

It was Jesus himself said; "When you pray do not keep on babbling like pagans, for they think they will be heard because of their many words" (Matthew 6:7). Jesus instead encourages us to keep things as simple as we can, to be open to quieter prayer, to be willing to sit in silence, to listen to some quiet music, to think of those whom we would like included in our prayers and to 'just be', in where ever our prayer place may be.

We don't have to win God over with many words. The invitation is to pray in trust and in simplicity. Probably the most beautiful invitation to such a prayer is another line in Matthews Gospel: "Come to me, all you who labour and are overburdened and I will give you rest" (Matthew 11:29). In the busy, hectic and sometimes cluttered world that we live in, this invitation to turn to the Lord with whatever is going in our lives is simply irresistible.
 
 
 
  Monday
Jul-10
Thought For The Week

'Cluttered times of prayer wear us out. Instead of being revived in body and soul, as the Lord wants, we can come away weary from our busy praying.' ~from the 'The Simplest Prayer' by the Irish Franciscans

We are all aware of a cluttered house or a cluttered room. We can have stuff thrown everywhere, sometimes things piled on top of each other and not nice to look at. Clutter means energy will struggle to flow; it is stagnant and not good for us in the long run. We have also seen the opposite, of a room that is clutter free. It is bright, clean, it feels positive and the energy can flow freely. Usually such a space is welcoming, warm and a good place to be.

The same applies to prayer too. We can clutter prayer up with lots of words, lists of prayers, novenas and other prayers that we think we should be saying or were told to say. There is nothing of course wrong with our own favourite prayers and it is great if we have these. But if our prayer time is crammed full, then we need to look as to why it is so cluttered. We need to be willing to let go of the stuff that no longer nurtures us spiritually.

It was Jesus himself said; "When you pray do not keep on babbling like pagans, for they think they will be heard because of their many words" (Matthew 6:7). Jesus instead encourages us to keep things as simple as we can, to be open to quieter prayer, to be willing to sit in silence, to listen to some quiet music, to think of those whom we would like included in our prayers and to 'just be', in where ever our prayer place may be.

We don't have to win God over with many words. The invitation is to pray in trust and in simplicity. Probably the most beautiful invitation to such a prayer is another line in Matthews Gospel: "Come to me, all you who labour and are overburdened and I will give you rest" (Matthew 11:29). In the busy, hectic and sometimes cluttered world that we live in, this invitation to turn to the Lord with whatever is going in our lives is simply irresistible.
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jul-09
Our Thought For Today is by Triona Doherty called 'Rest for your souls'

Pope Francis had some strong words of advice recently for priests. As he ordained ten men to the priesthood on Good Shepherd Sunday, he said in his homily: 'A priest who has perhaps studied much theology and has achieved one or two or three advanced degrees, but has not learned to carry the Cross of Christ, is useless: he will be a good academic, a good professor, but not a priest. Please, I ask you in the name of Christ and of the church to be merciful, always: do not saddle the faithful with burdens they cannot carry - nor ought you so burden yourselves.'

He must have been thinking of the extract from Matthew's Gospel that we hear today, where Jesus talks about the exact opposite of laying burdens on people - he promises to take them away, and to lighten our load.

I don't think Jesus is saying that the Christian life is always going to be easy, that there will not be burdens or crosses to carry, or that we should not hold ourselves to high standards. Rather, he is reminding us that when we find ourselves overburdened - tired, frustrated, afraid, overwhelmed, disheartened - help is at hand. He invites us to come to him, and to unload our troubles onto him. He is a place of rest for our weary souls. With Jesus on board, our minds and hearts will be lighter, and we can get on with our tasks with renewed energy and zeal.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Jul-08
Thought For The Week

'If anyone gives so much as a cup of cold water to one of these little ones because they are a disciple, then I tell you solemnly, they will most certainly not lose their reward.' ~Matthew 10:42

This Gospel line speaks about keeping things simple. If we struggle or lack confidence in the things we can't do, Jesus has some good news for us. He reminds us to do the simple things well. To do what we can do as best we can is so much better than nothing at all.

Jesus talks about the simple act of welcoming someone with a cup of water and the difference this gesture could make. Small acts of kindness and hospitality can make such a difference. Pope Francis speaks so much about this. In one of his letters he says, "Love is shown by the little things, by attention to small daily signs which make us feel at home. Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love."

We so often tend to complicate our faith and Jesus tells us to keep it simple. So little gestures of love, little acts of kindness, little ways of reaching out and little moments each day are the ones that do make a difference. There are lots of them and we do our best to make the most of them.

Also this week


10 commandments to get along with people. Even one or two of these could be a great help to us on our daily journey!

(1) Say less than you think. Cultivate a calm voice, how you say it often means the most.
(2) Make promises sparingly, keep them faithfully.
(3) Never lose opportunities to say a kind word to or about somebody. Praise work well done.
(4) Be genuinely interested in others. Let everyone you meet feel that you regard them as if they are the only person that matters in the world.
(5) Be cheerful as best you can.
(6) Keep an open mind on all debatable questions. There's a big difference between discussing something and arguing something.
(7) Don't give in to gossip. It is so destructive.
(8) Respect the feelings of others.
(9) Pay no attention to those who think less of you. There are always knockers in this world but know that there are many more people willing to uplift and encourage.
(10) It won't cost you anything, smile!!
 
 
 
  Friday
Jul-07
Thought For The Week

'If anyone gives so much as a cup of cold water to one of these little ones because they are a disciple, then I tell you solemnly, they will most certainly not lose their reward.' ~Matthew 10:42

This Gospel line speaks about keeping things simple. If we struggle or lack confidence in the things we can't do, Jesus has some good news for us. He reminds us to do the simple things well. To do what we can do as best we can is so much better than nothing at all.

Jesus talks about the simple act of welcoming someone with a cup of water and the difference this gesture could make. Small acts of kindness and hospitality can make such a difference. Pope Francis speaks so much about this. In one of his letters he says, "Love is shown by the little things, by attention to small daily signs which make us feel at home. Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love."

We so often tend to complicate our faith and Jesus tells us to keep it simple. So little gestures of love, little acts of kindness, little ways of reaching out and little moments each day are the ones that do make a difference. There are lots of them and we do our best to make the most of them.

Also this week


10 commandments to get along with people. Even one or two of these could be a great help to us on our daily journey!

(1) Say less than you think. Cultivate a calm voice, how you say it often means the most.
(2) Make promises sparingly, keep them faithfully.
(3) Never lose opportunities to say a kind word to or about somebody. Praise work well done.
(4) Be genuinely interested in others. Let everyone you meet feel that you regard them as if they are the only person that matters in the world.
(5) Be cheerful as best you can.
(6) Keep an open mind on all debatable questions. There's a big difference between discussing something and arguing something.
(7) Don't give in to gossip. It is so destructive.
(8) Respect the feelings of others.
(9) Pay no attention to those who think less of you. There are always knockers in this world but know that there are many more people willing to uplift and encourage.
(10) It won't cost you anything, smile!!
 
 
 
  Thursday
Jul-06
Thought For The Week

'If anyone gives so much as a cup of cold water to one of these little ones because they are a disciple, then I tell you solemnly, they will most certainly not lose their reward.' ~Matthew 10:42

This Gospel line speaks about keeping things simple. If we struggle or lack confidence in the things we can't do, Jesus has some good news for us. He reminds us to do the simple things well. To do what we can do as best we can is so much better than nothing at all.

Jesus talks about the simple act of welcoming someone with a cup of water and the difference this gesture could make. Small acts of kindness and hospitality can make such a difference. Pope Francis speaks so much about this. In one of his letters he says, "Love is shown by the little things, by attention to small daily signs which make us feel at home. Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love."

We so often tend to complicate our faith and Jesus tells us to keep it simple. So little gestures of love, little acts of kindness, little ways of reaching out and little moments each day are the ones that do make a difference. There are lots of them and we do our best to make the most of them.

Also this week


10 commandments to get along with people. Even one or two of these could be a great help to us on our daily journey!

(1) Say less than you think. Cultivate a calm voice, how you say it often means the most.
(2) Make promises sparingly, keep them faithfully.
(3) Never lose opportunities to say a kind word to or about somebody. Praise work well done.
(4) Be genuinely interested in others. Let everyone you meet feel that you regard them as if they are the only person that matters in the world.
(5) Be cheerful as best you can.
(6) Keep an open mind on all debatable questions. There's a big difference between discussing something and arguing something.
(7) Don't give in to gossip. It is so destructive.
(8) Respect the feelings of others.
(9) Pay no attention to those who think less of you. There are always knockers in this world but know that there are many more people willing to uplift and encourage.
(10) It won't cost you anything, smile!!
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Jul-05
Thought For The Week

'If anyone gives so much as a cup of cold water to one of these little ones because they are a disciple, then I tell you solemnly, they will most certainly not lose their reward.' ~Matthew 10:42

This Gospel line speaks about keeping things simple. If we struggle or lack confidence in the things we can't do, Jesus has some good news for us. He reminds us to do the simple things well. To do what we can do as best we can is so much better than nothing at all.

Jesus talks about the simple act of welcoming someone with a cup of water and the difference this gesture could make. Small acts of kindness and hospitality can make such a difference. Pope Francis speaks so much about this. In one of his letters he says, "Love is shown by the little things, by attention to small daily signs which make us feel at home. Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love."

We so often tend to complicate our faith and Jesus tells us to keep it simple. So little gestures of love, little acts of kindness, little ways of reaching out and little moments each day are the ones that do make a difference. There are lots of them and we do our best to make the most of them.

Also this week


10 commandments to get along with people. Even one or two of these could be a great help to us on our daily journey!

(1) Say less than you think. Cultivate a calm voice, how you say it often means the most.
(2) Make promises sparingly, keep them faithfully.
(3) Never lose opportunities to say a kind word to or about somebody. Praise work well done.
(4) Be genuinely interested in others. Let everyone you meet feel that you regard them as if they are the only person that matters in the world.
(5) Be cheerful as best you can.
(6) Keep an open mind on all debatable questions. There's a big difference between discussing something and arguing something.
(7) Don't give in to gossip. It is so destructive.
(8) Respect the feelings of others.
(9) Pay no attention to those who think less of you. There are always knockers in this world but know that there are many more people willing to uplift and encourage.
(10) It won't cost you anything, smile!!
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Jul-04
Thought For The Week

'If anyone gives so much as a cup of cold water to one of these little ones because they are a disciple, then I tell you solemnly, they will most certainly not lose their reward.' ~Matthew 10:42

This Gospel line speaks about keeping things simple. If we struggle or lack confidence in the things we can't do, Jesus has some good news for us. He reminds us to do the simple things well. To do what we can do as best we can is so much better than nothing at all.

Jesus talks about the simple act of welcoming someone with a cup of water and the difference this gesture could make. Small acts of kindness and hospitality can make such a difference. Pope Francis speaks so much about this. In one of his letters he says, "Love is shown by the little things, by attention to small daily signs which make us feel at home. Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love."

We so often tend to complicate our faith and Jesus tells us to keep it simple. So little gestures of love, little acts of kindness, little ways of reaching out and little moments each day are the ones that do make a difference. There are lots of them and we do our best to make the most of them.

Also this week


10 commandments to get along with people. Even one or two of these could be a great help to us on our daily journey!

(1) Say less than you think. Cultivate a calm voice, how you say it often means the most.
(2) Make promises sparingly, keep them faithfully.
(3) Never lose opportunities to say a kind word to or about somebody. Praise work well done.
(4) Be genuinely interested in others. Let everyone you meet feel that you regard them as if they are the only person that matters in the world.
(5) Be cheerful as best you can.
(6) Keep an open mind on all debatable questions. There's a big difference between discussing something and arguing something.
(7) Don't give in to gossip. It is so destructive.
(8) Respect the feelings of others.
(9) Pay no attention to those who think less of you. There are always knockers in this world but know that there are many more people willing to uplift and encourage.
(10) It won't cost you anything, smile!!
 
 
 
  Monday
Jul-03
'If anyone gives so much as a cup of cold water to one of these little ones because they are a disciple, then I tell you solemnly, they will most certainly not lose their reward.' ~Matthew 10:42

This Gospel line speaks about keeping things simple. If we struggle or lack confidence in the things we can't do, Jesus has some good news for us. He reminds us to do the simple things well. To do what we can do as best we can is so much better than nothing at all.

Jesus talks about the simple act of welcoming someone with a cup of water and the difference this gesture could make. Small acts of kindness and hospitality can make such a difference. Pope Francis speaks so much about this. In one of his letters he says, "Love is shown by the little things, by attention to small daily signs which make us feel at home. Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love."

We so often tend to complicate our faith and Jesus tells us to keep it simple. So little gestures of love, little acts of kindness, little ways of reaching out and little moments each day are the ones that do make a difference. There are lots of them and we do our best to make the most of them.

Also this week


10 commandments to get along with people. Even one or two of these could be a great help to us on our daily journey!

(1) Say less than you think. Cultivate a calm voice, how you say it often means the most.
(2) Make promises sparingly, keep them faithfully.
(3) Never lose opportunities to say a kind word to or about somebody. Praise work well done.
(4) Be genuinely interested in others. Let everyone you meet feel that you regard them as if they are the only person that matters in the world.
(5) Be cheerful as best you can.
(6) Keep an open mind on all debatable questions. There's a big difference between discussing something and arguing something.
(7) Don't give in to gossip. It is so destructive.
(8) Respect the feelings of others.
(9) Pay no attention to those who think less of you. There are always knockers in this world but know that there are many more people willing to uplift and encourage.
(10) It won't cost you anything, smile!!
 
 
 
  Sunday
Jul-02
'If anyone gives so much as a cup of cold water to one of these little ones because they are a disciple, then I tell you solemnly, they will most certainly not lose their reward.'

Our Gospel today speaks about keeping things simple. If we struggle or lack confidence in the things we can't do, Jesus has some good news for us. He reminds us to do the simple things well. To do what we can do as best we can is so much better than nothing at all.

Jesus talks about the simple act of welcoming someone with a cup of water and the difference this gesture could make. Small acts of kindness and hospitality can make such a difference. Pope Francis speaks so much about this. In one of his letters he says, "Love is shown by the little things, by attention to small daily signs which make us feel at home. Faith grows when it is lived and shaped by love."

We so often tend to complicate our faith and Jesus tells us to keep it simple. So little gestures of love, little acts of kindness, little ways of reaching out and little moments each day are the ones that do make a difference. There are lots of them and we do our best to make the most of them.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Jul-01
'John was a preacher, a prophet, a signpost pointing people in the right direction. We can pray today for all those people who acted as signposts in our lives and brought us closer to God'~Jane Mellett

Last Saturday (June 24th) we celebrated the feast of John the Baptist. The eve of this feast day is marked in Cork with lots of bonfires, even though the connection with the feast day of St. John has largely been forgotten. The feast day of St. John the Baptist also coincides with the longest day of the year in the northern hemisphere. Long before Christianity took root, people placed great hope in light and that light would always conquer darkness.

John the Baptist was a celebrity in his own way. Thousands flocked to hear him and be baptised by him. But John was not interested in fame. He never wanted to draw attention to himself. John's mission was to prepare the way for Jesus. He was a bit like a grounds man before an important game. He lined the pitch, mowed the grass just right and got everything ready as it should be. Then when the game started he stepped back knowing his job was done. There are many people who quietly work away in a similar way. The work they do is vitally important and often they do not get the praise or attention they deserve.

John wanted to draw attention only to Jesus. Sometimes we hang our heads and often we're not proud of what we believe in. It's almost as if it is unfashionable and a bit embarrassing to say we believe. John was the exact opposite. He had no reservations and no inhibitions in proclaiming that he was proud to be a follower of Jesus. We too are called to hold our heads up. We are called to be proud of what we believe and to be grateful that we have indeed something to build our lives on.
 
 

 

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