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LISTING THOUGHT ARCHIVE

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Listing November - 2018
 
  Tuesday
Nov-13
Thought For The Week

'I think what I'm at peace at: I have this, I'm going to remain positive, there is so much stuff I want to do, little things, enjoying the things I have taken for granted before." ~Gareth O'Callaghan

Former radio presenter Gareth O'Callaghan has been recently diagnosed with Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), a rare neurodegenerative disease that attacks and destroys the body's central nervous system. This rare disease targets three very important areas of your brain and central nervous system and over a period of time, it begins to progress more rapidly. It targets your movement in the same way Parkinson's would, but it also targets the autoimmune system which looks after your breathing, your swallow, you perspiration, blood pressure, bladder, digestive system and over a period of time it impairs them to a point that they no longer work and basically you become immobile.

On Thursday afternoon he gave an interview with Daithi O Se and Maura Derrane on the RTE show 'Today'. What struck me through the interview was his incredible sense of honesty, openness and positivity. So instead of crumbling into hopelessness and giving up, he has embraced life with the attitude of making the most of today, as it is the only day that matters.

The following words from Gareth are food for thought today: "We go through life wondering what's out there for us. It's not what's out there for us, it's what's here now. Stop trying to be like other people. Stop trying to aspire to what other people are. Just remind yourself every time you think of where you are in this particular day, of who you are and what you mean to other people. Don't stress about the small stuff, it's not worth it. Be most mindful of what you are capable of doing. Most important the people you love, tell them regularly and as often as you can that you love them."


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Monday
Nov-12
Thought For The Week

'I think what I'm at peace at: I have this, I'm going to remain positive, there is so much stuff I want to do, little things, enjoying the things I have taken for granted before." ~Gareth O'Callaghan

Former radio presenter Gareth O'Callaghan has been recently diagnosed with Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), a rare neurodegenerative disease that attacks and destroys the body's central nervous system. This rare disease targets three very important areas of your brain and central nervous system and over a period of time, it begins to progress more rapidly. It targets your movement in the same way Parkinson's would, but it also targets the autoimmune system which looks after your breathing, your swallow, you perspiration, blood pressure, bladder, digestive system and over a period of time it impairs them to a point that they no longer work and basically you become immobile.

On Thursday afternoon he gave an interview with Daithi O Se and Maura Derrane on the RTE show 'Today'. What struck me through the interview was his incredible sense of honesty, openness and positivity. So instead of crumbling into hopelessness and giving up, he has embraced life with the attitude of making the most of today, as it is the only day that matters.

The following words from Gareth are food for thought today: "We go through life wondering what's out there for us. It's not what's out there for us, it's what's here now. Stop trying to be like other people. Stop trying to aspire to what other people are. Just remind yourself every time you think of where you are in this particular day, of who you are and what you mean to other people. Don't stress about the small stuff, it's not worth it. Be most mindful of what you are capable of doing. Most important the people you love, tell them regularly and as often as you can that you love them."


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Sunday
Nov-11
Thought For Today is by Jane Mellett called 'The Widow's Mite' taken from the Intercom Magazine

In today's Gospel, Jesus is courageously speaking out against the hypocrisy of the religious leaders of his time. He is encouraging all his followers to engage in a reality check. The hypocrisy of the scribes is in total contrast to the humility and generosity of the widow in the second part of the Gospel. She gives not of what she has to spare, but everything she has. She is freer than the others.

We can be quick to make judgements about another person's commitment based on what we see happening on the outside. Those leaders who acquire the best seats and show up in all the frills may not actually be all they appear to be. Jesus is urging us to look into the person's heart for what is there is far more important than all the trappings on the outside.

The widow gives everything and this does not have to be about money. We might recall those today who give us their time, their support, who pray from the heart and give of themselves expecting nothing in return. We might thank them, pray for them. We can also look into our own hearts today and challenge our motivations for what we do. Can we give more of ourselves to God or to someone we love? A listening ear, 'wasting time' with people, looking at how we spend our money.

Jesus calls us to search our hearts and the hearts of others in today's gospel. The widow models Jesus' way of discipleship in contrast to the those in positions of leadership and power.
 
 
 
  Saturday
Nov-10
Thought For The Week

'Life and death are intricately connected. They are natural, inevitable processes that everyone goes through and you cannot pull them apart. Life is usually revered and death is commonly feared. It could be argued that without an awareness of death, life would not matter as much as it does.' ~Dean Ratore

It is well know that we Irish do funerals well. Many check out rip.ie to see if a loved one has died in their local area. There is almost an inbuilt automatic response to sympathise with a family in bereavement. We attend the removal or the funeral, we may call to the house, we may send a sympathy card or we may write a letter to the family.

The most common line used at a removal, from those sympathising to the mourner is: "I am sorry for your loss." It's not about having the right words or wondering what should I say because often there are no words. Our presence is really valued, even when it might seem that shaking hands randomly isn't going to make much of a difference. Our gentle presence around the time of the death of a loved one does make a significant difference.

During November we reflect much more on death than any other time of year. With the onset of winter and decreasing daylight it happens naturally. Our Christian rituals allow us to do it in a way that is both meaningful and healthy. The rituals may not take away the pain of grief, but they allow gentle healing that is always welcome and important. So whether it is a local prayer service in your local church remembering those who have died, a visit to a local cemetery, the lighting of a candle or flicking through a photo album packed with memories, they all serve one function, which is to remember with love.

Life is linked to death and it is only because it has to end that it has purpose, meaning and value. This is the way it has always been, the way it is now and the way it will continue to be. If we fear death or dread it or hate the thought of what it might be like, we will always be on edge. We will be carrying around with us a nervous energy.

The constant message of scripture and especially the Resurrection stories is that death is not to be feared and that it is the beginning of a journey into light, love and peace. Coming from this faith foundation allows us to be more comfortable with death and in doing so actually allows us to live life more fully. Life is lived, cherished and celebrated in the moment that we call today and especially in the moment that we call now. I hope your journey through November will allow you some time, even briefly to reflect upon death, to remember with love your loved ones and to remind you just how precious and special your life is.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Friday
Nov-09
Thought For The Week

'Life and death are intricately connected. They are natural, inevitable processes that everyone goes through and you cannot pull them apart. Life is usually revered and death is commonly feared. It could be argued that without an awareness of death, life would not matter as much as it does.' ~Dean Ratore

It is well know that we Irish do funerals well. Many check out rip.ie to see if a loved one has died in their local area. There is almost an inbuilt automatic response to sympathise with a family in bereavement. We attend the removal or the funeral, we may call to the house, we may send a sympathy card or we may write a letter to the family.

The most common line used at a removal, from those sympathising to the mourner is: "I am sorry for your loss." It's not about having the right words or wondering what should I say because often there are no words. Our presence is really valued, even when it might seem that shaking hands randomly isn't going to make much of a difference. Our gentle presence around the time of the death of a loved one does make a significant difference.

During November we reflect much more on death than any other time of year. With the onset of winter and decreasing daylight it happens naturally. Our Christian rituals allow us to do it in a way that is both meaningful and healthy. The rituals may not take away the pain of grief, but they allow gentle healing that is always welcome and important. So whether it is a local prayer service in your local church remembering those who have died, a visit to a local cemetery, the lighting of a candle or flicking through a photo album packed with memories, they all serve one function, which is to remember with love.

Life is linked to death and it is only because it has to end that it has purpose, meaning and value. This is the way it has always been, the way it is now and the way it will continue to be. If we fear death or dread it or hate the thought of what it might be like, we will always be on edge. We will be carrying around with us a nervous energy.

The constant message of scripture and especially the Resurrection stories is that death is not to be feared and that it is the beginning of a journey into light, love and peace. Coming from this faith foundation allows us to be more comfortable with death and in doing so actually allows us to live life more fully. Life is lived, cherished and celebrated in the moment that we call today and especially in the moment that we call now. I hope your journey through November will allow you some time, even briefly to reflect upon death, to remember with love your loved ones and to remind you just how precious and special your life is.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Thursday
Nov-08
Thought For The Week

'Life and death are intricately connected. They are natural, inevitable processes that everyone goes through and you cannot pull them apart. Life is usually revered and death is commonly feared. It could be argued that without an awareness of death, life would not matter as much as it does.' ~Dean Ratore

It is well know that we Irish do funerals well. Many check out rip.ie to see if a loved one has died in their local area. There is almost an inbuilt automatic response to sympathise with a family in bereavement. We attend the removal or the funeral, we may call to the house, we may send a sympathy card or we may write a letter to the family.

The most common line used at a removal, from those sympathising to the mourner is: "I am sorry for your loss." It's not about having the right words or wondering what should I say because often there are no words. Our presence is really valued, even when it might seem that shaking hands randomly isn't going to make much of a difference. Our gentle presence around the time of the death of a loved one does make a significant difference.

During November we reflect much more on death than any other time of year. With the onset of winter and decreasing daylight it happens naturally. Our Christian rituals allow us to do it in a way that is both meaningful and healthy. The rituals may not take away the pain of grief, but they allow gentle healing that is always welcome and important. So whether it is a local prayer service in your local church remembering those who have died, a visit to a local cemetery, the lighting of a candle or flicking through a photo album packed with memories, they all serve one function, which is to remember with love.

Life is linked to death and it is only because it has to end that it has purpose, meaning and value. This is the way it has always been, the way it is now and the way it will continue to be. If we fear death or dread it or hate the thought of what it might be like, we will always be on edge. We will be carrying around with us a nervous energy.

The constant message of scripture and especially the Resurrection stories is that death is not to be feared and that it is the beginning of a journey into light, love and peace. Coming from this faith foundation allows us to be more comfortable with death and in doing so actually allows us to live life more fully. Life is lived, cherished and celebrated in the moment that we call today and especially in the moment that we call now. I hope your journey through November will allow you some time, even briefly to reflect upon death, to remember with love your loved ones and to remind you just how precious and special your life is.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Wednesday
Nov-07
Thought For The Week

'Life and death are intricately connected. They are natural, inevitable processes that everyone goes through and you cannot pull them apart. Life is usually revered and death is commonly feared. It could be argued that without an awareness of death, life would not matter as much as it does.' ~Dean Ratore

It is well know that we Irish do funerals well. Many check out rip.ie to see if a loved one has died in their local area. There is almost an inbuilt automatic response to sympathise with a family in bereavement. We attend the removal or the funeral, we may call to the house, we may send a sympathy card or we may write a letter to the family.

The most common line used at a removal, from those sympathising to the mourner is: "I am sorry for your loss." It's not about having the right words or wondering what should I say because often there are no words. Our presence is really valued, even when it might seem that shaking hands randomly isn't going to make much of a difference. Our gentle presence around the time of the death of a loved one does make a significant difference.

During November we reflect much more on death than any other time of year. With the onset of winter and decreasing daylight it happens naturally. Our Christian rituals allow us to do it in a way that is both meaningful and healthy. The rituals may not take away the pain of grief, but they allow gentle healing that is always welcome and important. So whether it is a local prayer service in your local church remembering those who have died, a visit to a local cemetery, the lighting of a candle or flicking through a photo album packed with memories, they all serve one function, which is to remember with love.

Life is linked to death and it is only because it has to end that it has purpose, meaning and value. This is the way it has always been, the way it is now and the way it will continue to be. If we fear death or dread it or hate the thought of what it might be like, we will always be on edge. We will be carrying around with us a nervous energy.

The constant message of scripture and especially the Resurrection stories is that death is not to be feared and that it is the beginning of a journey into light, love and peace. Coming from this faith foundation allows us to be more comfortable with death and in doing so actually allows us to live life more fully. Life is lived, cherished and celebrated in the moment that we call today and especially in the moment that we call now. I hope your journey through November will allow you some time, even briefly to reflect upon death, to remember with love your loved ones and to remind you just how precious and special your life is.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Tuesday
Nov-06
Thought For The Week

'Life and death are intricately connected. They are natural, inevitable processes that everyone goes through and you cannot pull them apart. Life is usually revered and death is commonly feared. It could be argued that without an awareness of death, life would not matter as much as it does.' ~Dean Ratore

It is well know that we Irish do funerals well. Many check out rip.ie to see if a loved one has died in their local area. There is almost an inbuilt automatic response to sympathise with a family in bereavement. We attend the removal or the funeral, we may call to the house, we may send a sympathy card or we may write a letter to the family.

The most common line used at a removal, from those sympathising to the mourner is: "I am sorry for your loss." It's not about having the right words or wondering what should I say because often there are no words. Our presence is really valued, even when it might seem that shaking hands randomly isn't going to make much of a difference. Our gentle presence around the time of the death of a loved one does make a significant difference.

During November we reflect much more on death than any other time of year. With the onset of winter and decreasing daylight it happens naturally. Our Christian rituals allow us to do it in a way that is both meaningful and healthy. The rituals may not take away the pain of grief, but they allow gentle healing that is always welcome and important. So whether it is a local prayer service in your local church remembering those who have died, a visit to a local cemetery, the lighting of a candle or flicking through a photo album packed with memories, they all serve one function, which is to remember with love.

Life is linked to death and it is only because it has to end that it has purpose, meaning and value. This is the way it has always been, the way it is now and the way it will continue to be. If we fear death or dread it or hate the thought of what it might be like, we will always be on edge. We will be carrying around with us a nervous energy.

The constant message of scripture and especially the Resurrection stories is that death is not to be feared and that it is the beginning of a journey into light, love and peace. Coming from this faith foundation allows us to be more comfortable with death and in doing so actually allows us to live life more fully. Life is lived, cherished and celebrated in the moment that we call today and especially in the moment that we call now. I hope your journey through November will allow you some time, even briefly to reflect upon death, to remember with love your loved ones and to remind you just how precious and special your life is.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Monday
Nov-05
Thought For The Week

'Life and death are intricately connected. They are natural, inevitable processes that everyone goes through and you cannot pull them apart. Life is usually revered and death is commonly feared. It could be argued that without an awareness of death, life would not matter as much as it does.' ~Dean Ratore

It is well know that we Irish do funerals well. Many check out rip.ie to see if a loved one has died in their local area. There is almost an inbuilt automatic response to sympathise with a family in bereavement. We attend the removal or the funeral, we may call to the house, we may send a sympathy card or we may write a letter to the family.

The most common line used at a removal, from those sympathising to the mourner is: "I am sorry for your loss." It's not about having the right words or wondering what should I say because often there are no words. Our presence is really valued, even when it might seem that shaking hands randomly isn't going to make much of a difference. Our gentle presence around the time of the death of a loved one does make a significant difference.

During November we reflect much more on death than any other time of year. With the onset of winter and decreasing daylight it happens naturally. Our Christian rituals allow us to do it in a way that is both meaningful and healthy. The rituals may not take away the pain of grief, but they allow gentle healing that is always welcome and important. So whether it is a local prayer service in your local church remembering those who have died, a visit to a local cemetery, the lighting of a candle or flicking through a photo album packed with memories, they all serve one function, which is to remember with love.

Life is linked to death and it is only because it has to end that it has purpose, meaning and value. This is the way it has always been, the way it is now and the way it will continue to be. If we fear death or dread it or hate the thought of what it might be like, we will always be on edge. We will be carrying around with us a nervous energy.

The constant message of scripture and especially the Resurrection stories is that death is not to be feared and that it is the beginning of a journey into light, love and peace. Coming from this faith foundation allows us to be more comfortable with death and in doing so actually allows us to live life more fully. Life is lived, cherished and celebrated in the moment that we call today and especially in the moment that we call now. I hope your journey through November will allow you some time, even briefly to reflect upon death, to remember with love your loved ones and to remind you just how precious and special your life is.


Thought For The Week is updated each Monday
 
 
 
  Sunday
Nov-04
'Love is such an overused word. Pop songs sing about love. Everything revolves around love. Many people only connect love with the idea of fulfilled sexuality. But however much the word is misused, in the depths of our heart every one longs for love.' ~Anselm Gruen

We all know someone special who radiates love. It is not an act or something put on. They radiate it naturally and it simply flows from them. Everyone has the ability to do this but for different reasons the flow becomes blocked. It might be a hurt, a knock or setback in life. Someone may have betrayed our trust. We may have been taken advantage of or we may have grown afraid because others hurt us in the past. Scripture readings refer to God as love. This is 100% pure natural Divine love. It is total, complete and will never run out. Each day is an invitation to soak in some of this love. The invitation is to allow it melt away our hurts, fears, anxieties, disappointments or darkness in our lives. Every time we take up this invitation allows us to radiate our own love naturally. No matter what our age, our belief system or our background, this is what we are born to do.

Today we mark All Saints Day and tomorrow we celebrate All Souls Day. It is sacred time as remember with love those who were an important part of our lives. Their love touched our lives deeply and we mark it in a number of different ways. We are also invited to let God's love touch us too, particularly those parts of our lives that need it the most.
 
 
 
  Friday
Nov-02
'If the people we love are taken from us, the way to have them live on is to never stop loving them. Buildings burn, people die but real love is forever.' Author Unknown

Irish people have a great respect for the dead. During this month of November many will visit a cemetery, say a prayer for a loved one who has died and decorate a grave with a flower or a nightlight. Whether or not one should pray for the dead is one of the great arguments which divide Christians. Any prayer is always good. Praying for those who have died is also a good thing. In prayer we stand in God's presence and in praying for those who have died we are in some way connected with them. Today the feast of 'All Souls' is a day to pray for those who have died. Our nearest and dearest who have gone on before us will always have a special place in our hearts. They will never be forgotten.
 
 

 

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